Jump to content

1/12 scale Fire Service hook ladder wagon, wood and metal kit by Model Trailways


Recommended Posts

it does look good doesn't it. It's not my first build of one of their kits, a few years back I built their Western Mountain Buckboard.

 

almost_done_j4usks.jpg

following the advice they give in the instructions, check the kit against the parts list, one metal casting missing, a rope cleat, so I've filled in their online form and I'll wait and see what their customer service is like. If it's anything as good as Miniart's then I'll expect a part in the mail. In the meantime, there is a long way to go in the construction process before I'll need it.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

this is the rope cleat that's missing from the kit. The parts list shows there should be two, but the kit only has one. 

missing_part_kaxfiv.jpg

before I filled in their online form and sent it off, I tried to case one out of lead, my first attempt was a fail, but I'll wait and see if one turns up in the post.

failed_casting_hwpwov.jpg 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

getting the wheel jig just right took time, the hub has to be central within a fraction of a MM. Measuring between the hub outer edge and the inside curve of the rim, then comparing four points till they were all the same. using dry fitted spokes to double check, before the rim was pinned.

vKpIMiI.jpg

the spokes are chamfered at the top wider end to form a arrow at the tip so the shoulders don't interfere with the fit, each spoke sanded, test fitted, sanded, test fitted. each spoke individually fitted

hIEGwrj.jpg 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

the spacers are all located away from the rim to avoid them gluing up against the spoke rim join. The final spokes going in, the pictures shows the pointed spoke going into the hub.

IIbwQnB.jpg 

of course a real wheel is mortice and tennon joined together. Wheelwrights were hard working craftmen, who when experienced, could make a wheel a day. But from the 1880's pre formed Hickory spokes were being imported from America to village wheelwright shops, but as early as the 1890's factory made wheels were coming out, making the village whelwright's job purely maintenance of his customers vehicles. Then along came the petrol engine, but that's another story.

doubeMy.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Patience, and plenty of cups of tea. 

The final spoke pressed into place, this forces pressure on all the spokes in the hub making them a stronger join.

Now that is assembled, I can place it to one side to dry while I start work on the front axle. After a cup of tea.

Gjbx9m7.jpg

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

the front axle metal parts, de burred, filed smooth, all the casting anomalies removed,painted black.

 

4cXysOL.jpg

the timber axle brace removed from the pre cut plank, sanded to shape to include the curves for the axle cleats (seen above)

27HvOYt.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

the first hind wheel lift from the jig.

first_hind_wheel_out_of_the_jig_tbg69m.j

end on, you can see the dish shape of the wheel, this lateral strength was built in to counter the natural side to side sway of the Horses transmitted through the shafts to the structure of the wagon.

first_hind_wheel_dishing_lcicw4.jpg

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

the front axle beam, shaped and bonded to the metal front axle. where the pegs are in contact, that surface is curved to accept the axle cleats.

front_axle_joined_to_beam_od6x2u.jpg

when that was dry I fitted the lower half of the steering swivel and joined it to the shaft. The axle cleats, (U bolts)

lay in front ready to go on.

fifth_wheel_joined_to_beam_with_u_bolts_

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

leave that to dry and start on the next hind wheel. The rim comes in one lazer cut piece like this. But a real rim is made up from curved segments known as Felloes, pronounced Fellies, by British Wheelwrights, a confusing fusion of English, Norman, Anglo saxon. More Oddly still, American Wheelwrights and wainwrights call them Felloes. So depending on what side of the pond you hail from....  

wheel_rim_before_seperation_zejkqm.jpg

the rim placed on the jig ready to start the next hind wheel.

second_hind_wheel_making_a_jlhrw5.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

starting on the main wagon frame, this will be painted red when it's built. First the two long sides have the axle supports parts fitted fore and aft.

axle_supports_a_yvduhl.jpg

the rest of the metal fittings all fettled and painted ready for use.

metal_parts_sprayed_en_mass_z7lhnh.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sprocket said:

end on, you can see the dish shape of the wheel, this lateral strength was built in to counter the natural side to side sway of the Horses transmitted through the shafts to the structure of the wagon.

Wow I never knew that. I thought wooden wheels were just flat and the strength was derived from using stronger or heavier wood. Coolo :thumbsup:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...