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Fun fact for the day.  The Moon's gravity is lumpy! 
No, not lumpy gravy, lumpy gravity.

This has affected the search for a couple of the Apollo Lunar Ascent Modules, including that of Apollo 11.
 


An amateur astronomer set out to work out what happened to the Eagle 

 

 

Edited by Walrus
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  • 4 months later...

Some exciting space science news is that the very much delayed James Webb Space Telescope is scheduled to be launched tomorrow (12.20pm GMT 25/12/2021)
Hopefully.   This project seems to be cursed, and the deployment could go horribly wrong.
Hoping that all goes well 

The orbit will be way out beyond the orbit of the moon at the Lagrange 2 point.
If you aren't familiar with the project:


 

 

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Posted (edited)

In case it hasn't been on the news, The James Webb Space Telescope's sunshields have fully deployed and have been successfully tensioned.
The process involved every on of the 150 pegs to be released in sequence and all the motors and pullies to function properly.
Each of the 5 shields are the size of a tennis court 

And just in!  More good news
2nd-mirror-deployed.jpg

If the JWST can successfully get to its orbit and the instruments calibrated, the telescope can function at this stage.
The two side panels will be able to provide a boost to the quality of the information received for optimal perfomance.


 

Edited by Walrus
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3 hours ago, Walrus said:

In case it hasn't been on the news, The James Webb Space Telescope's sunshields have fully deployed and have been successfully tensioned.
The process involved every on of the 150 pegs to be released in sequence and all the motors and pullies to function properly.
Each of the 5 shields are the size of a tennis court 

And just in!  More good news
2nd-mirror-deployed.jpg

If the JWST can successfully get to its orbit and the instruments calibrated, the telescope can function at this stage.
The two side panels will be able to provide a boost to the quality of the information received for optimal perfomance.

Seen nothing about the JWST in any news reports so thank you for the update Paul :thumbsup:

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The final locking pins have just secured the starboard mirror wing of the James Webb Space Telescope! 
All the parts have successfully deployed in order for the telescope to operate.

Will still take a couple of weeks or so to get in its final position and then months to configure all the operating systems.
But it is a remarkable feat of engineering to have even got this far! 

Congratulations NASA!

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, Col. said:

I'm guessing everything is moving slowly due to smaller motors being used to conserve weight and battery power?

Afaik that is correct, Col

The good news is that JWST made an perfect initial orbital trajectory on launch and another course correction went flawlessly.
This means that it saved fuel which will prolong it's working life.  

The individual hexagons on the mirror can be adjusted by something like 1/10,000th the width of a human hair to be able to shift to a fraction of a wavelength!
Focusing  the mirror will be the first part of getting the telescope up and running.

In terms of time, the JWST is about halfway there, but it's covered 75% of the distance, now travelling at a measly 1/4mile per sec. 

Edited by Walrus
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3 hours ago, Walrus said:

Afaik that is correct, Col

The good news is that JWST made an perfect initial orbital trajectory on launch and another course correction went flawlessly.
This means that it saved fuel which will prolong it's working life.  

The individual hexagons on the mirror can be adjusted by something like 1/10,000th the width of a human hair to be able to shift to a fraction of a wavelength!
Focusing  the mirror will be the first part of getting the telescope up and running.

In terms of time, the JWST is about halfway there, but it's covered 75% of the distance, now travelling at a measly 1/4mile per sec. 

There was a short feature about it on the ITV News earlier this evening. Was nice to see some good news for a change.

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