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After the struggle of the fourteen u/c bay  pieces and the squeezing in of the cockpit a bit more has been assembled.

Every part of the nose seems to be n two parts which makes life a bit awkward, why this should be is a bit beyond me.

The wings were a very good fit but again a bit of force was required to get them into the correct positions an added bonus one of the wing tips was missing so a new one was made.

Onwards and upwards as they sayūüėĆ

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Jens hit the nail on the head and eduard have produced a jewel of a kit, but I feel and Jens and I have had this discussion more than once that these kits,are a definite case of why use one part when you can use fourteen. Particularly that cowl which the cynic in me says was done so more resin cowls could be sold 

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8 hours ago, Grunhertz said:

Jens hit the nail on the head and eduard have produced a jewel of a kit, but I feel and Jens and I have had this discussion more than once that these kits,are a definite case of why use one part when you can use fourteen. Particularly that cowl which the cynic in me says was done so more resin cowls could be sold 

In order to incorporate the detail in the wheel well that Eduard has captured, they couldn't have fewer parts considering draft angles and pulling direction of the plastic.  The Airfix wheel wells have fewer parts, but they are not as detailed either.  Take your time with the wheel wells, and they will fit just fine with only small gaps.  I think the different aim of these two manufacturers show in these features.  Eduard provides a detailed kit and are not afraid of adding parts to do just that, whereas Airfix (attempt) to make them easier to assemble.  Having said that, I don't understand why Eduard decided to omit the oxygen hose in the cockpit.

The top cowling...in order to offer the choice of the original "flat" and slightly bulged cowling that came later (introduction of the Packard Merlin I believe), it made sense to have that as a separate part to avoid tooling up too many fuselage variants.  Also, the only way Eduard could capture the bulges on the side (note that the sides "tuck under") would either be two parts or a slide mould.  The latter was either beyond their capability to tool or too expensive.  I don't think Eduard planned to make a resin cowling for the kit as I seem to recall that Barracuda Studios made a resin replacement cowl for it first, and I guess Eduard wanted a piece of that pie.  In the three Eduard Merlin 60 series Spitfires I have completed so far plus another three on the go, I haven't seen the cowling as a problem.  Assemble carefully, let cure, sand and reinstate rivet detail.

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2 hours ago, Jens H. Brandal said:

introduction of the Packard Merlin I believe

Correct.

The Packard 266 has a different intercooler set up and position than the Merlin 66 necessitating the change in

cowling shapes.

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2 hours ago, Jens H. Brandal said:

In order to incorporate the detail in the wheel well that Eduard has captured, they couldn't have fewer parts considering draft angles and pulling direction of the plastic.  The Airfix wheel wells have fewer parts, but they are not as detailed either.  Take your time with the wheel wells, and they will fit just fine with only small gaps.  I think the different aim of these two manufacturers show in these features.  Eduard provides a detailed kit and are not afraid of adding parts to do just that, whereas Airfix (attempt) to make them easier to assemble.  Having said that, I don't understand why Eduard decided to omit the oxygen hose in the cockpit.

The top cowling...in order to offer the choice of the original "flat" and slightly bulged cowling that came later (introduction of the Packard Merlin I believe), it made sense to have that as a separate part to avoid tooling up too many fuselage variants.  Also, the only way Eduard could capture the bulges on the side (note that the sides "tuck under") would either be two parts or a slide mould.  The latter was either beyond their capability to tool or too expensive.  I don't think Eduard planned to make a resin cowling for the kit as I seem to recall that Barracuda Studios made a resin replacement cowl for it first, and I guess Eduard wanted a piece of that pie.  In the three Eduard Merlin 60 series Spitfires I have completed so far plus another three on the go, I haven't seen the cowling as a problem.  Assemble carefully, let cure, sand and reinstate rivet detail.

alternatively put an resin cowl on and save yourself the effort¬†ūüėĀ

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6 minutes ago, Grunhertz said:

alternatively put an resin cowl on and save yourself the effort¬†ūüėĀ

I've seen some people finding their resin cowlings either too long or too short, and that's a bigger problem than attending to a seamline:)

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2 hours ago, Jens H. Brandal said:

Also, the only way Eduard could capture the bulges on the side (note that the sides "tuck under") would either be two parts or a slide mould.  The latter was either beyond their capability to tool or too expensive.

^^^This. 

I don't think Eduard are averse to slide moulding, the cannon barrels and exhaust stubs are hollow, for example, but these are small components on the edge of the frames where it's easy to run a slide in and out. The fuselage would have been more technically challenging and expensive and even if they did it there would be moans about the visible mould line.

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Good point Paul.  The slides are small and easy on the sides, and I do tend to see a bit more flash around these features, so a slide moulded cowling would probably lose more detail in cleaning up any steps or misalignment than having the modeller join two easily moulded pieces.

 

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8 hours ago, Jens H. Brandal said:

Clean up parts carefully, take your time to dryfit the parts, and you will find it goes together better than any Airfix kit...

 

Thats not exactly a high bar you've set there Jens............

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20 hours ago, Ian Campbell said:

Every part of the nose seems to be n two parts which makes life a bit awkward,


My thoughts looking ahead to the 1/72 MkXVI is to attach the cowling halves to the fuselage halves rather than construct the cowling as a sub assembly.
Sorry I'm way too late with the suggestion, Ian.  (Assuming it will prove an easier method of construction.)


 

Edited by Walrus
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2 hours ago, Grunhertz said:

Thats not exactly a high bar you've set there Jens............

True that...  I find the fit of the kit generally rather good.  Certainly as good as any manufacturer except Tamiya.  One problem area I had with the first two was the lower cowling somehow stood proud of the fuselage sides.  AFter that, I learned to  not glue the lower halves of the forward fuselage until I could offer the lower cowling to ensure a level join.

The upper cowling fits well to the fuselage by using the now assembled fuselage as a gauge.  It can then be left off until later that allows you to paint the fuselage and exhaust stubs separately and then avoid a tricky masking job. 

Edited by Jens H. Brandal
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18 hours ago, Jens H. Brandal said:

Clean up parts carefully, take your time to dryfit the parts, and you will find it goes together better than any Airfix kit...

To be fair I've found the same routine works just as well with Airfix kits.

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1 minute ago, Col. said:

Not having tried that kit I'll remain blissfully ignorant :) 

dont blame you, to be honest there appears to be a bit of luck required with Airfix kits (most of mine has been bad) that said the whitley built up well 

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Oh yes, the design is fine, but I think the toolmaking is to blame as well.  The mouldings aren't as crisp as you'd expect in this day and age, so I think the tools are made to a budget, and that budget doesn't allow for Tamiya fit and finish.  With that in mind, the kit designers ought to take that into account, and it seems to me they don't...  If you know that you're not going to achieve that perfect fit that your design requires, then you should revise your design so that it is less tolerance sensitive.

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Definitely down to a budget, although the soapy plastic doesn't help and I agree they'd make life a little easier by increasing the fit tolerance. The kits manufactured in the factory at Newhaven used a harder plastic with infinitely better QC and were much better in most respects. 

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Think you boys have sussed it; good design - crap execution. There's a disconnect in the process of bringing an Airfix kit to market that is most likely down to a lack of communication somewhere along the line. Then again I've also had much worse model kits.

Ahem, so anyway, how's your Spitfire going Ian? :blush:

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It's primed, not happy with the exhausts, they look as if they stick out too far.

I may cut them off and shorten them, wouldn't say I would buy another one, if you remember I said it was left to rot in the back of the stash.

It should have stayed there.:cry:

It will get finished but It may be left for a while.

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