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Imai Macross Destroid Phalanx (1:00)

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Now for something completely different...1984, towards the end of term, a teacher brought some of these unwanted Macros robot kits in, and asked if anyone wanted them. I wasn’t into robot stuff, so didn’t bother, but my pal got this Destroid Phalanx. The next week he brought it in built and painted and I thought it looked awesome. Thirty-odd years later I finally figured out what the name of the kit was, and found this one for sale on EBay, from Italy:

uNfwTsml.jpg

Intention is to try some new techniques by finishing it heavily weathered, including paint chipping and rust staining. The decals are badly yellowed, and no doubt pretty brittle. They’re currently taped to a south facing window to let uv light do it’s job.

Part count is fairly low; it’s half toy, half scale model I guess:

bqzR40Px.jpg

ST6MN3bd.jpg

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It’s certainly a blank canvas, that’s for sure!

ULX8AH3G.jpg

The plastic is very brittle - I don’t think I’ll be making use of the articulated joints...

I love the tiny tube of glue that was included in the kit, very reminiscent of kits from a bygone era.

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Right; paint chipping. Not something that is easy to get looking right, so I tend to avoid it apart from maybe a few speckles of silver/grey pencil on my aircraft occasionally.

There are two main methods - apply whatever base colour you want the chips to be, overcoat with main colour and then selectively remove the top coat. Or apply the main colour and add the chips on top. The former method requires either an interface medium to be applied between coats to temporarily de-bond the top coat, or speckled masking which is removed after the top coat has set. The latter just needs a good way of applying random spots of paint.

For a starter for 10 I experimented with both, firstly a silver undercoat with a layer of MIG chipping medium (some people use hair lacquer, but the process is the same):

dHos87mX.jpg

Over coated with yellow:

aXaQhHVK.jpg

The other piece was just sprayed yellow.

The left image below shows the piece after soaking in water (to soften the top coat) and picking paint away with a cocktail stick. If you ignore the bright undercoat, the effect is good, but the chipping medium does tend to bulk up the surface, losing sharp details. The yellow is also slightly crazed.

Discounting the fluid due to those drawbacks, I then selectively applied dark grey paint (with a sponge) to the other (right side) sample. I also added some rust streaks with powder and thick dark wash:

3BkqLKEJ.jpg

I think if this method was more subtle, it would look fine. I’ve now stripped and repainted both samples and have added preshading to them, then I’ll add the chips once more and see how that looks before noting it down and getting on with the build.

Meanwhile, what little sunlight we get up here is doing a great job of clearing the yellowed decals:



3JOUiD13.jpg

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Having followed your ship builds I will enjoy following this one. I’m sure it will turn out great and that I will learn from the build. If you didn’t see it, during my recent Tank Hunters build in the AFV section, I had a go at both the chipping methods you are explaining and felt some of each was worth having.

Appreciating you explaining your methods 👍🏼

 

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Looks like a very interesting subject, It will be a great opportunity for your chosen weathering techniques. Great start, good luck.

Cheers

Richard

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4 hours ago, Toolmaker said:

Having followed your ship builds I will enjoy following this one. I’m sure it will turn out great and that I will learn from the build. If you didn’t see it, during my recent Tank Hunters build in the AFV section, I had a go at both the chipping methods you are explaining and felt some of each was worth having.

Appreciating you explaining your methods 👍🏼

 

Thanks, I'll take a look at your work

The samples I did...I don't know if they look like an old diecast toy that's been in a toy box too long rather than chipped metal on a robot!

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I like the chipping effect. It may be the base colour isn’t giving the “ heavy steel” effect your looking for?  Perhaps try an darker iron  type colour for the base coat and try re-chipping against that.

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So there's a lot of filling and flatting to do on this one...It's an old kit after all.

I've been working on the legs, the upper bits were assembled, filled, flatted and primed, then the knee joints painted and masked before closing the lower legs around them. I've been through the process of filling and flatting twice now, and I'm still getting some witness marks along the joins:

rmcwYxrR.jpg

The backs are quite intricate, and a bit crude. The internals of the small square box are very hard to get to with a chisel or whatever, so I've been dripping Mr.Surfacer 1000 into it to level the joints. Hopefully this will be the last iteration - every coat of primer dulls the surface detail, and this then makes an effective wash difficult to achieve.

The main torso is pretty much there:

OaSAFQFb.jpg

I usually airbrush even the smallest details, but on this occasion I've brush painted the grey with Vallejo Model Colour (mixed with retarder and thinned slightly). My son uses this method and can pretty much match an airbrush finish these days. Takes me back to when I used to build a kit in an evening...

The decals have been cooking in the sun for a while, and the yellowed carrier film is almost gone. The next issue with old decals is that they tend to disintegrate when put in water. To reduce this effect, I use Microscale Liquid Decal Film, which basically forms a thin film over the sheet and holds it all together long enough to place them on the model. It's best to cut each decal as close to the ink as possible with this method though.

NsSBNoEt.jpg

If all this fails, the last resort is to scan them, edit them on photoshop and re-print on decal paper. I hope it wont come to this though, since the model is after all yellow to start with...

On 22/02/2018 at 23:57, Toolmaker said:

I like the chipping effect. It may be the base colour isn’t giving the “ heavy steel” effect your looking for?  Perhaps try an darker iron  type colour for the base coat and try re-chipping against that.

I dunno, in reality it looks a bit like a metal toy thats been in a toy box for a few years, which isn't the effect I'm after. Chipping is tricky to scale right, so I may well not bother.

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As much of a non-robotty person I am, I really do find this kind of model very interesting - the built end results I see online often have some amazing diorama / themed poses which really add to the imagination behind mechinoid builds.

I have some MIG chipping agent but have not used it as you have on the black and yellow; I thank you for the simple tutorial here and shall retain the tip for my future use on an Eastern Tram kit I bought at the Weekend which has need of some lower panel chipping.

Good luck with your build - I bet you wished you had accepted the freebie kits all those 34 odd years back now..

 

 

 

 

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On 26/02/2018 at 13:45, Gimmie Shelter said:

As much of a non-robotty person I am, I really do find this kind of model very interesting - the built end results I see online often have some amazing diorama / themed poses which really add to the imagination behind mechinoid builds.

I have some MIG chipping agent but have not used it as you have on the black and yellow; I thank you for the simple tutorial here and shall retain the tip for my future use on an Eastern Tram kit I bought at the Weekend which has need of some lower panel chipping.

Good luck with your build - I bet you wished you had accepted the freebie kits all those 34 odd years back now..

 

 

 

 

Thanks, but it’s not really a tutorial - I’ve never done it before, at least not with much success.

Yes, I wish I’d have taken the kit now! 

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I’ve weathered the missiles, painted the doors and glued them into one half of each pod. Fit is crap - the inserts had to be packed with paper shims before flooding around with pva. I’ve test -assembled it (takes about 30 seconds):

fCHQyGfz.jpg

AollrBp1.jpg

Next job is to permanently close the pod halves, flat the joins and mask ready for painting.

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The moulded-in missile heads bothered me. It was impossible to paint them properly, while still weathering the back plates.

So Ive decided to take a resin cast of the whole thing, and separate the heads, then I’ll 3D print a recessed backplate and fit the assembly to the original surrounds. At least that’s the plan!

Here is an original part, Blu-Tacked into its moulding box:

fjUOKlmK.jpg

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I’m hoping the instruction not to use the supplied release agent on the pattern itself was correct...

ix2aWpwl.jpg

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The mould set OK, so I removed the base plate to reveal the original part embedded in the rubber:

jH1uKJsH.jpg

I added a couple of self-adhesive half beads from Hobbycraft to the plate before pouring, to give locations for the pattern halves once complete. It’s probably not really necessary in this case because it’s a flat feature on the split line, but whatever.

Next, built up the second half of the mould box, and added some feed tubes through which I’ll inject the resin. Finally, brushed some silicone release agent on the mould face:

udXsHUXs.jpg

6ndEaKzj.jpg

Mixed and poured the rubber, and currently waiting for it to set - probably over night:

wrwLG3Q4.jpg

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First cast not bad - got some bubbles in the mould, but I’m only after the missile heads really:

AsRLFIiy.jpg

Might try the moulding again, just so I’ve got the option of using a duplicate part if something goes really wrong...

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Nice one they look pretty good. If the bubbles are in the recessed section that could cause really filling problems 

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I do just love watching how modellers reproduce parts and there is nothing more fascinating for me than to see a decent bit of casting - must try it myself one day

love it....

 

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I’ve now removed the back from one of the resin copies, plus the missile tips. I’ve also 3D printed a new back plate with correctly spaced holes:

we4ppHKf.jpg

So now I can paint and weather the surround and back plate, and have pristine missile tips. All without masking. Just need to fill the 3D prints with filler primer and get them smooth.

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