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Toolmaker

1/35 Meng Whippet

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This was built the back end of last year, a nice easy build, out of the box, not too expensive and a makes a good canvas for trying out some painting ideas.

Thanks for looking

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Wonderful work. To me a base and figures can all too often distract the eye from a model and the latter spoil it if they are in any way unrealistic but these all add to your subject. Well done :notworthy:

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Thanks for all the comments, I appreciate the time given.

Col, I lean towards keeping things simple which probably typifies my mind set. I’m not really a stickler for historical accuracy but I do enjoy the build and like trying different ideas with the painting. That said I’m having a real struggle painting a pair of 1/35 scale German tank destroyers at the moment. 

 

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Cheers Rich, however its not always as it seems. The damaged fuel tank casing in the following picture was not caused by any lack of concentration by the driver.....it was my own lack of concentration. The top plate on the Meng kit is 1 piece and your supposed to apply gentle heat and fold. I wasn't gentle enough and I melted it, haha

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Edited by Toolmaker
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An intriguing question came up recently and I’m interested in the experience of the Brexit family. Now before  I continue, if the mods feel this should be a new topic somewhere else then move at will.

I’m a relative newcomer to the hobby with my first kit being built in 2013. Even more recently in 2018 I joined my first model club and experienced my inaugural show with them last month when I put this on the club table. During the show a member of the public asked if he could buy the model and if so how much. I won’t deny, that I felt a bit special, haha. That said, it was an easy answer to say I didn’t wish to part with the kit, however I’m interested to know how you might all put a value to your work.

The obvious answer seems to be that one could just reply with “how much did you have in mind sir/madam” and review it from there. I’m thinking if you get an offer you can’t refuse, and that will be a very individual thing, then the jobs a gudon.

So if this or similar has happened to you I’m genuinely interested in your views.

please, no disagreements, just points of view.

thanks

Paul

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I have been asked the same question Paul and to be honest I gave no idea how to value built kits I suppose it's how much it means to you if I were to charge by the hour plus thd price of the kit then ouch I'd never sell anything lol 

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I saw your post just before I logged off yesterday and it did get me thinking. I think if I was offered a reasonable price, I would sell most of my models and when I say reasonable I'm not talking hundreds. Once built, my models just sit in a wardrobe hidden away, so if someone was willing to pay £50-£60 or more each, then I would seriously consider it. The problem is getting a buyer as I don't take my models to shows and I'd be concerned about packaging them up for postage if I offered them for sale online. A bit of spare cash would be useful, and so would the extra storage space.

There are a few I would have to offered quite a lot to part with, generally the ones I've made a particular effort with, such as my Ju-87G, Hs-123 and my recent Roland. I wouldn't want to sell my two dioramas, but that's mainly because I intend to use them as photo props/backgrounds for future builds.

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Morning Everyone :) 

I built some Race Bikes a couple of years ago for a chap for an agreed fixed price, which in turn led to some others being ordered by another chap, The price was quite nice actually and I made a bit of money and enjoyed all builds. At one of our shows, a chap came along and said he wanted to buy one of my Yamaha M1 Race Bikes so I gave him what was the agreed price of the last lot of builds and Yes he says, pulls out his wallet and hands me the money :) 

I think if we put an hourly rate on builds, the way some of us build, they'd probably cost the earth but if you were doing it for a living then its a different thing. 

I look at it this way, the chap wanted the bike because he collects model bikes and he didn't have that one and was quite excited about it, so why not sell on. but I agree with Paul, find out what ballpark the buyer is in price wise, then go from there. I've seen people arguing with prospective buyers shooting out things like, 'do you know how long these take to build, do you know how much they cost'... which I think is the wrong approach. Find out what price the buyer is willing to pay, don't laugh or snigger if the amount is too low, don't launch into to 'do you know' speech, offer up a price you'd be happy with and suggest that. 

Just for examples sake, For the Yamaha, I said cost of the kit R350 (about 20 quid) plus another R350 came to R700 which, in the end, bought me 2 more kits :) 

( Please remember our money is worth Jack against Sterling so you might reckon whatever the equivalent in Pounds is, is ridiculous, but its not over here) 

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I have been asked to think of a price for the DH2 and tbh I have no idea I'll have to see because i am so proud of that model i don't know if i even want to sell it 

 

 

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This topic came up elsewhere, so apologies to anyone who has heard this before. A few years ago, someone approached me at Telford and asked me if I would be willing to sell one of my models. I said, yes, if the price was right. He offered me £20. Now I mostly build 1/35th armour, and the kit in question cost in the region of £40, plus another £20 plus for various bits of AM stuff. When I told him that I was thinking more like £80-100, I though that he was going to have cardiac failure. He had no idea of the costs involved. So therefore I would say to you, what was the cost of the kit, decals and any AM bits that you added to the build, then add a little bit on for your work and that's not an unreasonable sum. After all. Just look at what some people are asking for some of their built up models on Ebay...........and some of them are very mediocre.

 

John.

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Somebody offered me £50 for my 1/72 Concorde. That would barely cover the cost of the kit and the consumables that went into it, let alone the time spent building. To avoid any embarrassment I said it wasn't for sale  I would say never undersell your work, it's the cost of the materials plus time taken to build at a reasonable hourly rate. Your skills have a worth, hard learned over hundreds of hours. 

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