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Found 6 results

  1. 1/32 Me 262B-1a/U1 ‘Nightfighters of NJG11 EagleCals - Eagle Editions EC#170 Available from Eagle Editions for $22,50 This new release from Eagle Editions is designed to accompany, although not exclusively, the new Me 262B-1a/U1 kit from Revell, reviewed here. Of course, these will suit the earlier Trumpeter or Hasegawa kit, should you have them at all. A quick note to add here is that whilst this review looks at the 1/32 set, this specific release is also available in 1/48 and 1/72 scales, increasing your options considerably. Check out the Eagle Editions website for this and other Me 262 decal sets. This release is packaged into a re-sealable zip-lock sleeve that contains a single, folded instructions and scheme sheet, plus two decal sheets that are printed by Cartograf. The instructions are colour-printed and the front cover shows the port-side profiles for the THREE schemes in this set. The Me 262B was never a machine that was adorned with a variety of paint jobs. Many of them were very similar with RLM76 upper surfaces that were mottled with a combination of these various colours - RLM02, RLM75, RLM81, RLM82. The undersides were painted RLM22 black, as befitting night-fighter aircraft. Despite the limited variety of options, Eagle Editions has chosen three relatively different schemes from which to choose, including a captured machine that was flown by Watson’s Whizzers after first being surrendered to the British. The three schemes included here are: Me 262B-1a/U1 “Red 8”, W.Nr.110305, 10./NJG11 Me 262B-1a/U1, “Red 10”, W.Nr.110635, 10./NJG11 Me 262B-1a/U1, “Ole Fruit Cake”, W.Nr.110306, Watson’s Whizzers The last machine is quite interesting in its history, Originally operated by NJG.11 and previously identified as “Red 9” or “Red 6” (more than likely the former), this aircraft had a FuG 350Zc Naxos passive radar fitted in the rear cockpit, and the lower cannon barrels were extended. Please check references with this particular machine. The Luftwaffe surrendered this aircraft to the British as Scheswig in May 1945, where it was given the code FE-610. Applying the same scheme, this aircraft could always be modelled as it was in British hands, but you would need to sort the code yourself. Images of this aircraft in British hands will provide you some important camouflage tips for completing this under American colours. Inside the instructions, the three profiles are given in more detail, specifically for decal placement, and decal options are given for the starboard “Red 10” where it is possible that a different style and proportional of number was applied. Another nice are the multiple W.Nr and numerical code decals that are printed slightly differently, with good to sloppy alignment, to reflect how these were applied at this late war stage. Opening the instruction sheet up fully, you are supplied with notes for each scheme, with details as to colour application, plus historical and reference notes. On the opposite page, line drawings are supplied to indicate stencil locations. The last page of the instructions contains colour illustrations for the upper and lower surfaces, with notes for decaling. These illustrations are perhaps a little less aesthetic that the side profiles, and should be used in conjunction with photographic material for when it comes to scheme application. TWO decals sheets are supplied, printed by Cartograf as I mentioned earlier. The first sheet contains the American markings and nose art, German codes and Werknummers, plus a full suite of stencils and various dashed walkway lines. This sheet is divided into sections for clarity so you know exactly what you need for a specific scheme. The second sheet contains the German national markings, including swastikas. The latter are printed in two parts to as not to offend the sensibilities of at least one European country. These have the centres separate to the main outline, so that the larger portion will easily allow you to correctly place the decal. Decal printing is excellent, with nice glossy, solid colour that has been thinly printed. Carrier film is minimal and registration is perfect. Of course, depending on scheme, it is possible to build more than one of these machines from this set, ignoring stencil use. Conclusion A hard subject to tackle for the best of researchers, this Me 262B-1a/U1 decal set does cover a number of bases when it comes to the extra options available for some of the decals, leaving the ultimate decision to the modeller, whilst offering a rationale for their inclusion. These schemes also represent probably the most variety in schemes for this aircraft, with one German machine with entire upper RLM76, and the other with splinter camo wings. Of course, the American option provides that unusual element to this set. Coming from Eagle Editions, you know that the research here will have been thorough. Highly recommended. My thanks to Eagle Editions for this review sample. To purchase directly, click HERE
  2. Eduard 1:48 Messerschmitt Bf 109F Royal Class

    Eduard 1:48 Messerschmitt Bf 109F Royal Class This was the second major redesign of the Bf109. During 1939–40 we saw the birth of the F series. The "Friedrich" had a full redesign of the wings, the cooling system and fuselage, it was powered by the 1,159 HP Daimler Benz DB601N, fitted to the F-1 and F-2 or the 1,350 1,332 HP DB 601E in the F-3, F-4. Believed by many fans to the best of Bf 109 development, the F series did away with the wing cannons and relied on the armament in the forward fuselage using a pair of synchronised machine guns and a single 15 or 20 mm cannon mounted behind the engine, firing between the cylinder banks and then through the propeller hub. The configuration was used by all following variants. A few of Bf 109Fs saw action late during the Battle of Britain. However the series really came into wide use in the first six months of 1941. The Kit In the box you get enough parts to build two models using the parts from the 13 grey plastic sprues, two clear sprues, eight photo etch frets, 18 resin parts and one paper mask, also included is the standard Eduard instruction booklet and comprehensive decal sheet that has stencils for two builds and covers 14 colour scheme options. Being a Royal Class boxing you also get very nice beer class and coaster. The sprues follow Eduard’s normal, very high standard of moulding with good detail, no flash, blooming or sink marks. There appears to be a duplication of some parts on some of the sprues, however looking at the instructions they clearly mark a number of parts as not needed for the included options. Photo Etch In the box there is two frets for the instrument panels and seat-belts, two frets of radiator and other parts and three frets of fuselage and other parts. Resin With the kit you have four wheels and spokes, four exhaust assemblies and two tail wheels. Instructions. Instructions The instruction booklet is in Eduard’s standard format of nice clear drawings showing construction steps and part positioning. The parts needed or not needed for all the different options are clearly marked with large capital letters. Paint colours through the instructions refer to Gunze Aqueous and Mr Colour. Construction starts with what is often the norm, with the cockpit sub assembly, before moving on to fuselage assembly and then onto the nose and wings before finishing with the undercarriage, flaps, radiators, canopy antennas and all those little bits we all look forward to nearing completion of a build. Decals The decals are printed by Cartograf of Italy and are bright, unmarked and in perfect register. As previously mentioned there are options to finish the kits in 14 different options. they are: Bf 109F-1 Obstlt. Werner Molders, Stab JG 51, Krefeld, Germany, June 1941 Bf 109F-2 Lt. Detlev Rohwer. Stab 1./JG3, Byelaya Tserkov, Soviet Union. August 1941 Bf 109F-2 Oblt. Egon Mayer. 7./JG2, France, September 1941 Bf 109F-2 Maj. Gunther Lutzow, Stab JG3, Schataowka, Soviet Union October 1941 Bf 109F-2 Oblt. Hans-Ekkehard Bob, 9. JG/54, Siverskaya, Soviet Union December 1941 Bf 109F-4 Hptm. Heinz Bar, Stab1./ JG 77, Comiso, Sicily, July 1942 Bf 109F-4 Walter Nowotny, 3./ JG 54, Krasnovardyeysk, Soviet Union, July 1942 Bf 109F-4 Oblt. Johannes Steinhoff, Stab II./ JG 52, Klin, Soviet Union, December 1951 Bf 109F-4/Trop Uffz. Andreas Kuhn, 9./ JG 27, Daba, Egypt, November 1942 Bf 109F-4/B Uffz. Felix Sauer, 10.(Jaba)/ JG 53, San Pietro Sicily, March 1942 Bf 109F-4/Trop Stab II./ JG 27, Libya, February 1942 Bf 109F-4 Oblt. Helmut, 1./ JG 3, Frolov, Soviet Union, August 1942 Bf 109F-4 Fw. Heinrich Bartels, 8./ JG 5, Petsamo, September 1942 Bf 109F-4 Hdgy. Gyorgy Debrody, 5/2. vadaszsazad, Uman, Soviet Union, Spring 1943 Conclusion If you like the the Eduard Bf 109 range of kits and want a couple more with a few extras then the Royal class boxing is for you. Like all of Eduard’s 109 offerings you will be very happy with the quality of the kits. Our thanks to Eduard for this lovely review sample. Cheers
  3. 1/32 Me 262 detail sets

    1:32 Me 262 Detail sets Eduard Hot on the heels of the new 1:32 Revell Me 262B-1/U-1 Nightfighter release, comes this suit of PE sets from Eduard. Whilst these were sent to me as individually packaged products, these should be available as in Eduard’s BIG ED packet before too long, saving you a little money if you wish to utilise all items on your build. Let’s take a look at what Eduard has released for this new kit, and what it covers. #32395, Me 262B-1 exterior (Purchase link) This set comprises of a single fret of bare brass PE, packaged into Eduard’s usual slim, re-sealable wallet. Two A5 sheets are included for instructions, printed double-sided. When Eduard state that something is ‘exterior’, what they are actually mean is that it is exterior to the cockpit, so unless there are specific sets for things like engines and weapon bays etc. then you will find it on their exterior set. This particular one covers the landing gear and bays, weapons bay, engine areas and several other details that are scattered around the airframe. There is nothing in this release that is designed to majorly overhaul the Revell kit, as it simply doesn’t need it. Instead, this set helps to refine what is offered, and with generally very little surgery needed. For the engine areas, the upper removable cowls are to be fitted with interior constructional detail, and there is a pull handle for the Reidel starter in each nose cone. These housed a rudimentary petrol engine, so it was a little like pulling the starting cord on a lawn mower! For the engines, that really is it. The undercarriage and bays get a nice touch of PE, with a little port and plating detail, plus some extra detailing for the interior of some gear doors. Eduard will also release a set of resin wheels, and despite the kit parts being passable, they aren’t weighted. Some nice touches are added within the weapons bay. These include fastening plates for the gun bay doors, ejection chute and door internal detail, plus some very welcome latches to use if you position the doors in the open position. These are often forgotten about on many finished Me 262 models. A little fiddly, but well worth investing time in adding. One area that will need a little thought are the replacement of the slat actuation brackets. I’m not absolutely sure I would be totally comfortable in removing the moulded detail and fitting the PE parts. These are quite thin in relation to the plastic. Eduard has also supplied the metal plate detail that will be seen if the slat is drooped forward. A very nice touch. Other external details include end plates for the landing flaps, providing more detail here, and also for fuel filler caps that sit atop the fuselage, just forward of the canopy. Then it comes to sanding the seams, this detail is easily lost, so there’s no need to worry with these in your arsenal. Aileron, elevator and rudder trim tab actuators are also included. #32893, Me 262B-1 interior (Purchase link) Packaged as per the exterior upgrade, this set contains two PE frets; one in bare brass, and the other is nickel-plated and colour-printed. Again, instructions are printed double-sided across two sheets of A5 paper. Here we see the usual and obvious candidates in these particular sets, with a colour, mult-layer/part instrument panel and side consoles, both with extraneous lever detail etc. Some surgery will be required on the rudder pedal bar, and new pedals themselves are included. A rather nifty PE gunsight is also provided. This will be a little fiddly to execute, but it is an improvement over the kit part. A piece of clear acetate is included for the glass reflection plates. Instrumentation changes also apply to the radio transmitter and receiver units within the rear cockpit, with the main radio unit being composed entirely of PE, replacing the kit part. The pilot’s switch/fuse panel also benefits from a number of placards, as do other cockpit areas. A small number of seat modifications are also included, such as side plates that require the plastic parts to be thinned, and seat fixing brackets. Other areas addressed and corrected in this set are canopy actuation levers and fastening lugs, rear upper panel replacement, fuel filler cap detail (yes, in the rear cockpit!), and internal canopy details. Here you will find a real bonus; the night vision radar unit that is missing from the kit itself! This sits in the forward cockpit, and must surely have been a hindrance to the pilot during routine flying. One anomaly in this set is the inclusion of the data placards that fit to the electrical boxes in the weapon bay. As it wouldn’t have been economical for Eduard to have added these colour parts to the exterior set, they are included here. If you don’t want to go for the full fat interior detail, then consider the Zoom set which concentrates on the colour-printed parts only, and of course, costs a little less. That can be found HERE #32894 Me 262B-1 seatbelts steel (Purchase link) Eduard has now extended its steel belts range to cover this kit specifically. If you weren’t a fan of their original colour PE belts (and you either love or loathe them), then these might impress you more. Thankfully, these are now extremely thin and much easy to manipulate, and my limited experience of the range shows proved to me that the ink didn’t flake off. The appearance of them is also much better, with a little shading included. There is no need to construct a myriad of small parts here including belts and buckles, except for adding the padded section to the lap belts. It’s all done for you. This set also includes the attachment lugs for the Me 262 seats themselves. Supplied in a narrow sleeve, a single sheet of instructions clearly shows how these are installed to the model kit. #JX196 Me 262B-1 masks (Purchase link) I hate trying to mask something by hand, so these are always a godsend. A single sheet of kabuki paper masks includes parts for all of the canopy panels and also the wheel hubs. Due to the raised details on the hubs, these are supplied as outer circumferential parts only, which I actually prefer. Instructions are nice and clear, and you should have no problem in fitting these. Conclusion When the time comes to build this, I’ll certainly try to fit in as much of this as I can. I’m particularly impressed by the enhancements in the interior set, such as the radio equipment and the night vision unit. Some of the upgrades will require some extra care, and the one that comes to mind is the slat actuators. In all though, I think these upgrades are worth checking out. Highly recommended Thanks to Eduard for the review samples.
  4. Morning all, One of my favourite builds from last year, the thoroughly excellent 1/72 Eduard 110. Finished as part of a mini Battle of Britain project I had on the go. Thanks for looking, comments welcomed, Shaun
  5. 1:4 Bf 110 Instrument Panel

    Hi all, A nice little distraction from the usual stuff. Eduard's gorgeous little quarter-scale (and I don't mean 1:48!) Bf 110 instrument panel. Here it is, built OOB and painted with Gunze colours. Such an easy project too. All I did was to add some creases to the padded section.
  6. It must be a couple of years ago now, but I built the new Meng Komet for Tamiya Model Magazine, done to order in a bare wood and metal finish, using Uschi van der Rosten's excellent wood grain decals and some Alclad II paint. The kit is by no means perfect, and benefits from some Eduard and Aires, with maybe the Barracuda wheels thrown in too. The protruding wing fillet joint is also ugly and could do with fixing. Having said that though, the kit is good fun and looks real good when complete. Here are some photos of my model: