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  1. Here's the direct link to buy at BlackMike Models for £184.95, so no unpleasant customs to pay! https://www.blackmikemodels.co.uk/products/wingnut-wings-32045-gotta-g-1
  2. 1:32 Gotha G.1 Wingnut Wings Catalogue # 32045 Available from Wingnut Wings for $199.00 plus shipping The Gotha G.I was a heavy bomber used by the Luftstreitkräfte (Imperial German Air Service) during World War I. In mid-1914, Oskar Ursinus, the founder and editor of the German flying magazine Flugsport, began designing a large twin-engine seaplane of unconventional configuration. While most biplane designs have the fuselage attached to the lower wing, Ursinus had a snub-nosed fuselage attached to the upper wing, and twin engine nacelles mounted on the lower one. Apart from the aerodynamic benefits claimed by Ursinus, the aircraft's unorthodox layout provided excellent views for the three crewmen and broad fields of fire for the gunner. The design also matched the specifications that the Idflieg had issued in March that year for a "Type III" large military aircraft, and the construction of a prototype was ordered. The prototype first flew on 30 January. However, the aircraft was difficult to fly, lacking in structural integrity, dangerous to the crew in the event of a crash landing, and underpowered. Despite its shortcomings, it was sent to the Russian front in early 1915. With the design proved under service conditions, the Idflieg issued a contract on 1 April for series production to Gothaer Waggonfabrik AG, which acquired a license from Ursinus, who held the patent to the design. Gothaer chief engineer Hans Burkhard simplified and refined the design, which was originally known as the Gotha-Ursinus-Heeresflugzeug (Gotha Ursinus Army Aircraft), or "GUH," later known as the Gotha G.I or Gotha-Ursinus G.I. The first production aircraft was completed on 27 July 1915. These aircraft were powered by two 150 hp Benz Bz.III engines. Gothaer Waggonfabrik built 18 G.I aircraft in three batches of six before production ceased at the end of the year. The final batch was powered by 160 hp Mercedes D.III engines and featured an extra defensive machine gun and nearly double the armour of previous examples. Photos courtesy of Wingnut Wings A single example of the UWD, or Ursinus-Wasser-Doppeldecker floatplane version of the G.I was also built, ordered by the Navy in April 1915, and delivered in February 1916. It was used operationally until 2 October when it was written off after a hard landing. Today, little is known about the G.Is service history. Idflieg records show only small numbers ever in service on the front at any one time. By the time it reached the front, the Gotha G.I was already an easy target for faster and more manoeuvrable fighters, and the few pilot recollections that have survived are largely unfavourable to the type. The UWD seaplane is known to have participated in a successful air-raid on Dover sometime in 1916, bombing Langton Fort and the Shoulder of Mutton battery, but the exact date is not now known. The kit Well, this was certainly a surprise when announced. I don’t think I could recall a single person who said that a G.1 was going to be available to build in this scale! Not only that, but the Gotha UWD which is quite different in many ways. The latter will soon be reviewed by Jeroen Peters on the Large Scale Modeller forum. I also wasn’t expecting the box to drop through my metaphorical letter box either, so this was definitely a summer surprise. Now I had to beat the hot weather and give this my best. The G.1 was a large aircraft, so it’s no surprise (this time) that WNW needed to use one of their larger sized boxes to fit it all in. Whilst the box isn’t ram-packed full to the brim, some of those sprues are almost the entire footprint of the box. The Steve Anderson artwork depicts two G.1 aircraft (over 10% of their entire production!) being defended from a roving Airco DH2, by a solitary Fokker Eindecker. Steve’s art is always an event with WNW releases, and this beautifully atmospheric image captures the strange and ungainly lines of the G.1, in all its, er, beauty! For WNW, the G.1 and Gotha UWD represent a milestone in their company history. The following text is from their emailshot to customers before kit release: “We are pleased to announce that our 10th anniversary celebration release models, 32045 Gotha G.1 & 32053 Gotha UWD (our 68th and 69th releases) are now available for pre-order from shop.wingnutwings.com with shipping hopefully from late April or early May 2019. Pre-order deposit payment in full with 100% refund available upon request up to 26 April 2019 (NZ time). They should also be available from your regular preferred Wingnut Wings supplier. The extraordinary Gotha G.1 design of 1915 was the first in a line of famous twin engine bombers built by Gotha in the First World War. The high position of the partially armour-plated fuselage offered great visibility and effective fire positions for the gunner(s) but very little protection to the 3-man crew in the event of a nose over crash. The G.1 was initially conceived as a heavily armed fighter but was very quickly re-assigned to bombing duties and began the famous association of Gotha with First World War bombers.” Kit specifics for this particular G.1 release are: 349 high-quality injection moulded plastic parts. 9 photo-etched metal detail parts. 2x Benz 150hp Bz.III engines. 63cm wingspan. 20kg & 50kg Carbonit bombs, optional propellers, LMG 08 ‘Spandau’, LMG 14 ‘Parabellum’ & 2cm Becker cannon armament and mountings. 20kg Carbonit bomb dropping cage or underwing fairing. 28 page fully illustrated instruction manual. High-quality Cartograf decals included for 5 colour schemes Under that large lid, there are EIGHT sprues of grey styrene, all individually wrapped, plus a small fret of PE parts that’s tucked in with the single decal sheet for this release. WNW’s typically beautiful instruction manual completes the ensemble. Sprue A This is one of the two largest sprues in this release, with some serious moulding to be seen. It is also common to the G.1 and UWD versions. WNW has designed the rear fuselage to be separate to the nose section containing the crew. Here we see the rear fuselage in two sections (lower 3-sided section, and upper deck). Externally, detail is sparse, of necessity. There are some lacing details on the lower section, and a cockpit rear fairing section on the upper deck. However, internally we have more details with fuselage formers and what look like to be bracing cable detail. There some ejector pin marks in this area, but I can’t see anyone modelling this so any internal detail will be seen. If you do wish to, removing the marks won’t be too difficult with a fibreglass scratch pen or a small section of plasticard to hide them. Two sets of ailerons are moulded here, but we will only use one of them. The larger, balanced option is for the UWD seaplane version. All other parts on this sprue will be used with this G.1 release. The span of this model has caused WNW to break down the wing into sensible-sized sections, with the lower wing centre section being found here. This is where the two Benz 150hp Bz.III engines will be mounted in their nacelles. Through more necessity, these wing panels are moulded as single pieces due to how thin these wings were, so no upper/lower sections to glue together. This also allows for the superbly-moulded and super-thin wing trailing edges as seen in these photos. A delicately scalloped trailing edge depicts the wire which would have been pulled tight between the ribs due to the doped fabric. Rib detail/cap strips are also nicely represented. Also of note are the plugs in the underside wing-joint areas. These are, of course, designed to fit into the sockets that are moulded to the lower wing panels on Sprue B. There are some forward fuselage and cockpit parts included on this sprue, such as the pilot’s seat and cushion, control column and separate wheel, cockpit floor, internal walls (fuel tank wall, bulkheads etc.), map/document case, commander’s seat, magazines, inner wall frames, engine controls, fuel tank pressurising pump, super-detailed instrument board with rear face detail, etc. Decals are supplied for the individual instruments, as is standard with WNW kits. No crappy raised moulded details to negotiate here. Other parts include the struts which support the forward nose section from the lower wing centre-section, fuel gauge (alternative mounting positions), modified upper wing inner trailing edges, and a tail strut support. Sprue B Another sprue which is common to the G.1 and UWD. The remaining wing panels are moulded here, with the same level of finesse as seen on the lower wing panel with beautifully thin trailing edges. You can see on the lower wing panels the sockets which allow these to fit to the lower section, and the angle of the tab which creates that characteristic appearance of the G.1. With the upper wing panels, you can of course see the separate aileron provision, but also how the inboard trailing edge is separate, to accommodate the initial design and the modified version which allowed for better downward vision for the crew. WNW have provided the stabiliser as a single part, incorporating the elevator. I know some modellers would want to give the elevators some deflection, as can be seen in a few of the period images within the manual. With some care, I don’t think that would be too difficult. Sprue C This clear sprue has just one single part, and that’s the windscreen. Only one machine has this fitted, and you’ll need to open up a small hole to fit this part. Part clarity is excellent as always. To further protect this part, the sprue is also wrapped in an adhesive film that only tacks to the plastic. Sprue D (x2) We have our first sprue, or two of, which is specific to the G.1 release. There are many parts here that relate to the engine mounting and other engine errata, such as the radiators (single and paired core options) and their own mounts. Of note are the options for the forward nacelle cowls. One of these is specific to the very early machine on Scheme A. As this model also sits on wheels and not floats, this is where you will find some undercarriage parts, such as the wheels with their separate outward hubs. Other parts include the interplane struts, machine guns, tail plane struts and control horns, dual fin/rudder, Carbonit bombs and racks, two-part bomb dropping cage, and also some ground equipment too in the shape of the tail skid trestle. Sprue E (x2) Of these two sprues, only half of them will be used, and those are the engine parts (the gun rings, propellers etc aren’t used on the G.1). As with all WNW kits, the engines themselves are little works of art, being highly detailed and really calling out for the very best of the modeller’s skill to bring them to life. Cylinders are moulded separate to the crankcase, with separate magnetos, water pump, oil filter, intake manifold and rocker arms/springs completing the ensemble. Sprue F Our last sprue is also specific to this G.1 release, and again is another full box size moulding. A number of cockpit-related parts are moulded here, including the fuselage floor, bomb cage hatch, commander’s instrument board and document shelf, optional racks for internal 20kg Carbonit bombs. Parts for the G.1-specific forward fuselage are also moulded here, including the side panels, coaming, optional cupola etc. To fit the latter, you will need to modify the standard part, carefully. Two propeller options are included here (Integral and Reschke), and you’ll also find the parts for the engine nacelle bodies. An option to mount Carbonit bombs externally is also included, and these were mounted within a fairing, moulded here. Other parts include more undercarriage struts, pulpit gun ring, engine control rods, cooling water pipes, tail skid, 2cm Becker cannon. Photo Etch Parts are included here for the pilot lap belts and there are options for the neater and more realistic cooling jackets for the machine guns, plus their reticules. A name plate for the display base of your model, is also included. Decals The schemes for thee G.1 are very similar in many respects, and all five schemes are included on this single Cartograf-printed sheet. Crosses are supplied for the upper and lower sides of both wings, and scheme-dependent crosses for the fuselage, and of course the specific serials. Stencils and instrument decals are supplied. Printing is excellent, being nice and thin with minimal carrier film and a nice glossy finish. Colours are also solid. The five schemes supplied are: Gotha G.1 10/15, Fliegerersatz Abteilung 7 Sonderstaffel S.1, 1915 Gotha G.1 11/15, Fliegerersatz Abteilung 7 Sonderstaffel S.1, 1915 & 1916 Gotha G.1 13/15, Feld Fliegerabteilung 37, 1915 Gotha G.1 41/15, Kagohl 1, 1915 Gotha G.1 42/15 “Feodora”, Fliegerersatz Abteilung 3?, 1916 Instructions WNW’s instruction manuals are always an event, with their shaded assembly illustrations which clearly depict newly added parts, and colour illustrations designed to give the modeller an idea of what the finished and painted assemblies should look like. Annotation is clear and easy to follow, with paint codes supplied for Tamiya and Humbrol colours. FS codes are also supplied. Period images are also supplied showing details and whole airframes. One note here is that it’s clear from the rigging illustration that this model is veryinvolved in that area. It’s actually suggested you dispense with turnbuckles on this and simply do dot-to-dotrig with elastic cord. The last pages of this 28-page manual are given over to Ronny Bar’s excellent profile work and contain some history of the machine, as well as colour call-outs and clear decal position information. Conclusion A very unexpected surprise, but a very welcome one! When you consider the G.IV they released, it does make sense to visit thee subject that got them into bomber production. This large model is certainly odd to look at and it’s hardly surprising that only 20 were built, but it is an important subject, and one that WNW have managed to make very attractive with the sheer detail levels they’ve included. With a 63cm wingspan, this is no shrinking violet either, so you’ll need some space to display it, but should you give it a go, then you really won’t be disappointed. Totally stunning! Now, as WNW like esoteric and will venture outside their comfort zone, I’d like to ask where my Pou du Ciel is! My sincere thanks to Wingnut Wings for the review sample seen in this article. To purchase directly, click the link at the top of this article.
  3. 1:35 Concrete Mixer Set MiniArt Catalogue # 35593 Concrete. Since Roman times, there’s sure been a lot of it laid down, without a doubt. During WW1 & WW2 however, concrete laying really took off in use for fortification construction and the Germans were the real master of this. All over once-occupied Europe, from Poland to the Channel Islands, the remains of fortifications stand as silent sentinels to a more sinister and dark age that is still within living memory. Should you have wanted to lay this stuff down in smaller, less industrial quantities, then the principle was the same, and indeed remains pretty much unchanged today. You need a rotating mixer! Of course, some tools would be useful for it you needed to remove old concrete or rubble before you laid the wet stuff. MiniArt to the rescue with what I think is possibly the only mainstream, injection-moulded solution to your 1:35 concrete mixing problems. The kit This new release is packaged into the same size boxes as many of MiniArt’s smaller diorama accessory sets, with a nice, glossy finish and an end-opening box-flap. The front of the box shows the various contents in a situation setting whilst the rear shows each component with a suggested painting chart with colours that are represented with Vallejo, Mr Color, Lifecolor, Tamiya, Testors, AK Real Color, Humbrol, Revell, and Mission Models codes. I’m pretty sure you could fathom these yourself though, although the suggestions are useful. Inside the box, SIX sprues of light grey styrene are packed into various clear sleeves so as to minimise any possibility of damage. One of these sprues (Df) was quite long and has been carefully split into two parts so it would comfortably fit into the packaging. The strange sprue nomenclature possibly means that some of the parts here are generic to other sets, and it’s just the inclusion of the concrete mixer that gives this set its overall remit. Sprue Bf What we have here are some hand tools. No assembly is required, and all you’ll need to do is to snip them from the sprue and clean them up, ready for paint. Tools moulded here include a pickaxe, lump hammer, stone hammer, crowbar, shovel and spade. Details really are very nice, and these deserve some good wood and metal replication to show those details. Sprue Df The star of the show and the raison d'êtreof this whole set, this two-part sprue contains the concrete/cement mixer. Covering six constructional sequences, the agricultural-looking mixer looks every bit a period piece of construction equipment. I can’t tell whether this would be engine-powered within the case, via the side crank handle, or if the drum is manually turned with the box unit containing a gearing mechanism. The box has no internal detail, so it’s all pretty academic really. You can see from the instructions the detail that has gone into this particular item, and there is a fair amount of construction to complete it. In all, there are thirty-three parts involved in the construction of this unit, and the details really are excellent! Sprue Ef Not just one bucket, but two, and in different sizes. The bodies of these are moulded as single parts but with separate bases. No handles are included as you will make these from lengths of fine wire. Holes will need to be drilled in the handle mounts, to accommodate the wire. Sprue Gd Moving those sand and cement bags and tools around, plus mixed concrete/cement, calls for simple help, in the form of a wheelbarrow. This rustic-looking contraption consists of two wooden side frames that hold the wheel at the front and whose beams form the handles at the rear. The wheel is wooden-spoked with a metal hoop around its circumference. Spacers add rigidity to the frame. A single-moulded part forms the barrow container, and this just sits atop the frame. Sprue Kf (x2) These identical sprues hold all the parts for the sand/cement bags. Each is constructed from halves, and with a separate tied bag end that plugs into the top of them. In fact, the seams on these could probably double as the stitched seam if you allowed enough plastic to goop out when you glue, and then leave a trail of it afterwards. These bags are also designed to be stacked, should you wish. There are four in total. To enhance the parts further, you could add some texture with a cloth after brushing some thin cement onto their surfaces. Instructions A four-page, black and white instruction sheet is included with three of these taken over with construction of the set. Remember, the tools themselves need no assembly, only paint to complete. Illustrations are by means of line drawings with shading used where appropriate. Everything is very, very easy to follow. Conclusion Another fabulous set from MiniArt! Pretty soon, with the aid of these guys, there will be no diorama that will be difficult for a modeller to create, from tools, crates etc. These sets are superbly made, easy to assembly, highly detailed and also very reasonably priced. My sincere thanks to MiniArt for the sample seen in this review.
  4. 1:48 Focke-Wulf Triebflügel WWII German VTOL Fighter Amusing Hobby Catalogue # 48A001 The Focke-Wulf Triebflügel, or Triebflügeljäger, literally meaning "thrust-wing hunter", was a German concept for an aircraft designed in 1944, during the final phase of World War 2 as a defence against the ever-increasing Allied bombing raids on central Germany. It was a vertical take-off and landing tail-sitter interceptor design for local defence of important factories or areas which had small or no airfields. The Triebflügel had only reached wind-tunnel testing when the Allied forces reached the production facilities. No complete prototype was ever built. The design was particularly unusual. It had no wings, and all lift and thrust were to be provided by a rotor/propeller assembly, a third of the way down the side of the craft. When the aircraft was sitting on its tail in the vertical position, the rotors would have functioned similarly to a helicopter. When flying horizontally, they would function more like a giant propeller. The three rotor blades were mounted on a ring assembly supported by bearings, allowing free rotation around the fuselage. At the end of each was a ramjet. To start the rotors spinning, simple rockets would have been used. As the speed increased, the flow of air would have been sufficient for the ramjets to work and the rockets would expire. The pitch of the blades could be varied with the effect of changing the speed and the lift produced. Fuel would be carried in fuselage tanks and piped through the centre support ring and along the rotors to the jets. A cruciform empennage at the rear of the fuselage comprised four tailplanes, fitted with moving ailerons that would also have functioned as combined rudders and elevators. The tailplane would have provided a means for the pilot to control a tendency of the fuselage to rotate in the same direction as the rotor, caused by the friction of the rotor ring, as well as controlling flight in pitch, roll and yaw. A single large and sprung wheel in the extreme end of the fuselage provided the main undercarriage. Four small castor wheels on extensible struts were placed at the end of each tailplane to steady the aircraft on the ground and allow it to be moved. The main and outrigger wheels were covered by streamlined clamshell doors when in flight. When taking off, the rotors would be angled to give life in a similar manner to a helicopter. Once the aircraft had attained sufficient altitude the pilot would tilt it over into level flight. The rotors continued spinning in level flight maintaining 220 rpm at the aircraft's maximum forward speed. Forward flight required a slight nose-up pitch to provide some upward lit as well as primarily forward thrust. Consequently, the four cannon in the forward fuselage would have been angled slightly downward in relation to the centreline of the fuselage. To land, the craft had to slow its speed and pitch the fuselage until the craft was vertical. Power could then be reduced, and it would descend until the landing gear rested on the ground. This would have been tricky and a probably dangerous manoeuvre, given that the pilot would be seated facing upward and the ground would be behind his head at this stage. The kit This is Amusing Hobby’s first ever aircraft release in any scale, and it’s not only an unusual subject, but extremely welcome for those of us that like something a little esoteric. This is the first injection plastic kit of this subject in this scale, as far as I can see. In the past we have had 1:48 resin kits from the likes of Arba, Planet Models and Reheat, all of varying quality and standards. A new-tool kit of modern tool standards is definitely an exciting addition. The kit itself comes in a relatively small box with an artwork showing two Triebflügel in flight, and apparently not long from take-off due to the angle of the machines. This kit has bubbling on the back burner for a little while now, as is evident from the artwork which is dated 2017. Lifting the lid reveals EIGHT sprues of tan-coloured styrene and a single clear sprue. Although the sprues aren’t generally bagged separately, they are packaged with multiples in the same sleeve. It’s evident from the outset that this isn’t a complicated model and could be a nice, quick project. A decal sheet is included, as is a short instruction manual. No PE is included in this release. Whilst the cockpit opening is quite small and you won’t be able to see too much in there, no seatbelts are supplied, so I do suggest you source some aftermarket solution. Sprue A Our first sprue contains the four clear parts on this release. Two of these are for the canopy (windscreen and hood), plus the gunsight reflector. Two of these are provided, so you have a spare. The canopy can be posed either open or closed, and framing looks well-defined, therefore easy to mask the transparency before painting. No masks are supplied, so you may have to look towards an Eduard release for those. Clarity on all parts is also excellent. Sprue B (x3) These three sprues cater to the rotors and jet engines for the aircraft, with one of each on each sprue. The rotor foils themselves are very simple in construction, being built from an upper and lower panel. Surface detail is exquisite and very, very fine. Each jet engine comprises a fan, intake vane, 2-part main body shell and a forward cowl. The main body is recessed to neatly accept the rotor tip. There are two other parts on here which aren’t on the instructions. One is a small ring and the other, a compete impellor face. Sprue C (x4) Where the Triebflügel has three rotors, for stability, it has four fins that create the cruciform appearance of the rear fuselage. Each fin is supplied as halves, and within this, fits a gear support leg that can be positioned to suit either a gear-down or in-flight scenario. A gear fork and wheel then fit to the end of this. Clamshell gear covers are also supplied. When on the ground, these fold back 90 degrees out of the way of the ground. Sprue D This is the largest of the sprues and contains all of the parts for the fuselage, cockpit and central landing gear. Building commences with the cockpit which is built into the separate nose section. The office comprises an integral floor and rear bulkhead, onto which sit the consoles, rudder pedals and pedal bar, control stick, pilot seat, instrument panel and rear coaming. A gunsight is also provided. There are no seatbelts with this kit, so you’ll need to source some. Whilst fuselage detail is superb, there isn’t any sidewall detail within. It might be a good idea to add a little styrene or spare colour PE components to make it a little busier there, especially as the canopy can be posed open. Four gun muzzle tubes also fit to the exterior. The fuselage itself is split into three sections; nose, rotating ring assembly, and the rear fuselage/tail unit. There are two discs on this sprue which fit to a separate rotor mounting unit, which will then allow it to be positioned by the modeller. The rear unit consists of halves into which a bulkhead is fitted, and then the central landing gear wheel. None of the wheels are weighted, so you might want to fix that. Again, a clamshell unit is supplied which would have enveloped the main wheel when in flight. They thought of everything! The last parts here are a whip aerial and a DF loop. All details across these parts is very good, with perhaps just the pilot seat letting it down a little. I think I’ll make a few changes here. Externally, detail consists of delicate panel lines and access ports, plus some very subtle riveting. I really do like this one. Miscellaneous One part was originally moulded to the exterior of another sprue but has been removed for safety. This slide-moulded part forms the rotating fuselage ring into which the rotors and their jet engines will plug. Just a minimum of clean-up is required here. Decals A single decal sheet is provided in this release, covering four scheme subjects. No instrument or stencils are supplied; this is a pure scheme sheet. There is nothing on this sheet to suggest where they are printed, but overall quality looks very good, with minimal carrier film, solid colour, and perfect registration. You can have a good rummage through the various markings and come up with something quite unique due to the variety of national insignia. No swastikas are included (surprise, surprise!), so if you want to add them, you’ll need to look through your spares box. Instruction Manual and scheme sheets This eight-page manual is all that’s needed to cover such a simple assembly job. Construction is shown over 10 stages spanning just 4 pages. Everything is perfectly clear to understand. I can’t see any problems arising. The four schemes are included as two separate fold-out sheets with all profiles supplied. Colour references are supplied for AMMO paints. AMMO have worked in conjunction with Amusing Hobby on this release. Conclusion For a first foray into aircraft, Amusing Hobby has sort of stuck to their leftfield approach to subject matter, and again, a machine which we’ve been crying out for in injection-moulded plastic. The model is superbly and simply engineered with a very passable cockpit (albeit, sand seatbelts), exquisite surface detail, and excellent moulding standards. It also looks very easy to assemble and shouldn’t provide the modeller with any issues, if their test shot imagery is anything to go by! As this aircraft never existed, you can also play around with the supplied schemes, or create something even more esoteric. In all, a lovely looking kit that I can’t wait to dive into! Watch out for my build in a forthcoming issue of Model Airplane International magazine. My sincere thanks to Amusing Hobbyand Kai for sending this kit out for review. Available very soon from your favourite model retailer!
  5. See, Aires is a piece of piss. It's only our levels of patience that vary.
  6. If you just sand down the taper at the front so it matches the kit part, the whole unit fits perfectly. I think it's one of their better ones. That taper is only the section you see sanded in that picture, and you're only removing 1mm or less on both sides.
  7. As with most things Aires, some remedial work is needed to make the resin parts fit as they should. Their resin pit is actually very nice, but is slightly too wide at the front. I assembled this with a few bits of tape and did some sanding with a coarse sanding stick. Only took about 10 mins of work to fix, and here's the result.
  8. I actually built this for Tamiya Magazine about 5yrs ago, in a wood/metal ensemble. Certainly a quirky model to build.
  9. After some soul-searching, I've decided to go with a Luftwaffe machine, simply because I want to display the model with its engine, guns and ammunition. The British evaluation machine wouldn't allow that, so from now, she'll be painted like this:
  10. Hi ladies, Now the Buchon is complete, I've been asked to build a Komet for Model Airplane International.I have a rake of AM for this too, which I'll selectively use as some is a little crappy or it'll be a choice between good and better. I was going to build this as a Luftwaffe machine but thought two German machines in a row would make some in this hobby think I'm a nazi sympathiser. In that light, I'll build the machine that was captured and test flown by Eric Brown. I had an opportunity to chat with him a few years ago about his Komet flight, so this seems to be a fitting way of remembering the guy. I will use some artistic license though as I believe the machine he flew was unarmed and most certainly won't have carried ammunition, but I will install it just the same. Basis for this build is the excellent if slightly fiddly Meng kit, with some Eduard, MASTER, and Aires stuff thrown at it. I don't expect this model to take too long as I don't want to be taken away from the F-104 which I will shortly show here on LSM. Anyway, here we go!
  11. Yes, I use Gunze H20 Flat Clear. I find it's one of the best I've used so far. Complete and coming to a forthcoming issue of Military Illustrated Modeller!
  12. All Gunze paints. I still love that brand. ❤️
  13. The model is actually painted and decaled now, but here are a couple of photos of what I have on my Mac before I dump and edit the other photos. Got to say this is a very enjoyable project!
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