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sovereignhobbies

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Everything posted by sovereignhobbies

  1. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    We've been getting some useful feedback that whilst customers generally know what the schemes they're planning to use look like, the vast majority (the silent majority?) don't know what the correct terminology is and usually don't know the proper names of the paint colours used. As such, our written format names are missing the mark for most potential customers. As a result, we're investing some time (we have no budget to pay people to do this) drawing illustrations and designing more graphic labelling for our sets. Hopefully these are a little bit more visually appealing and crucially help customers both at model shows and online simply identify the scheme they want to model and have confidence they're getting the right colours to do it. It's when you start an exercise like this that you realise how many drawings are actually required! Gulp! We hope you like them
  2. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Regia Aeronautica Mid-War set. Verde Oliva Scuro 2 over Nocciola Chiaro 4 camouflage on the upper surfaces with Grigio Azzurro Chiaro 1 on the undersides. Enamel model paint
  3. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Colourcoats Set US Navy WWII Pacific 1943-44 Colourset ANA606 Semi-Gloss Sea Blue ANA607 Non-Specular Sea Blue ANA608 Intermediate Blue ANA611 Interior Green ANA601 Insignia White ANA605 Insignia Blue. Tri color scheme. Enamel model paint
  4. sovereignhobbies

    HMS Prince of Wales 1941

    HMS Prince of Wales must be a contender for some of the most botched schemes ever applied to models. That said, given the number of conflicting sources that's perhaps not surprising. Some sources even reference paints that would not be available until 3 years after the ship was lost. Others, such as Tamiya's instructions, seem to assume that the Royal Navy's camouflage was a free for all using all sorts of random colours. In any case, HMS Prince of Wales was extensively photographed in mid-late 1941, albeit in black and white. These photographs alone consign many proposed schemes to the bin because the photographs show light tones where the suggested scheme shows dark, and vice versa. We can also dismiss any schemes featuring paints which did not exist at the time - those cannot be well considered if the author suggesting it did not know his paint colour timeline! Study of the black and white photographs allows an accurate map of the camouflage demarcations to be assembled. Furthermore, it is possible to count five separate camouflage colours on each side. Thus, we can eliminate suggested schemes comprising of four colours. That leads to the remaining schemes which are plausible tonally. HMS Prince of Wales was however filmed in colour, just once and very briefly at that, in summer 1941 not too long after the paint was applied, and this gives us an invaluable insight into the hues present. All considered, here's what we have come up with:
  5. sovereignhobbies

    HMS Prince of Wales 1941

    Due to popular demand, I have added scrap views of the superstructure athwartships views. Every 14" gun barrel is camouflaged in its own right, and there is some camouflage carried onto the turret tops (which may be mostly MS1) - but I'm out of time now and need to do other stuff for Telford.
  6. sovereignhobbies

    HMS Rodney 1942

    Another scheme we've worked on lately has been HMS Rodney. Some of the model kit painting guides have made me want to cry (see Trumpeter's 1/700 box art below), whilst the internet is flooded with "colourised" photographs which add to the confusion. Furthermore, whilst Rodney wore the same shape of pattern from 1942 until she was dismantled, the actual colours seem to have changed as the original paints used were rationalised to a simpler colour palette in the 1943 revision to the "B & G series" paints. That, also, doesn't help. Trumpeter box art Trumpeter painting instructions: Or this - I don't know where this came from but it appears on Google when searching images for "Rodney 1942"! Ficticious "colourised" photograph: Rodney is fairly well photographed leaving Liverpool in 1942 wearing her brand new scheme in immaculate condition, and furthermore was filmed in colour during Operation Pedestal, itself a very rare thing in the Royal Navy - strictly speaking filming was disallowed except by official war correspondents, but a blind eye was turned to some officers with a pre-existing hobby for filming however the films had to be submitted for rather heavy censorship. Anyway, the Op Pedestal footage is a bit washed out, and like much cinefilm is over or underexposed in places, however the footage does demolish many suggested colour schemes in circulation. Furthermore, Rodney was subject to several contemporary paintings. Some post war paintings also exist. One particularly notable painting however is by Stephen Bone who saw Rodney first hand. Bone was an official war artist, which is good, but his credentials are further enhanced because before that appointment he worked at the Camouflage Directorate at Leamington Spa - where the Royal Navy camouflage paints were developed and where the Admiralty tasked with developing bespoke camouflage designs for individual cruisers, capital ships and aircraft carriers as well as the standardised designs for destroyers and smaller ships - so Bone knew what colours he was seeing.
  7. sovereignhobbies

    1/350 HMS Imperial D09

    Due to a family connection... I wished to build the I-class destroyer HMS Imperial, pennant number D09, which was built by Hawthorn Leslies in Tyneside in 1936. The I class was a continuation of the Brazilian H making Peter's kit a very good starting point, however there are some differences to be addressed. The easiest problem is that the I-class had 4 of the 4.7in QF Mk.IX single mounts. The Hesperus kit provides 3, lacking Y-turret. Peter kindly supplied my kit with a fourth mount knowing my plans for this kit. Next up, the H-class funnels were unequal height but both had oval cross sections. On the I-class, the aft funnel was taller, approximately equal in height to the forward funnel. The forward funnel was circular in cross section. Armed with a set of plans (again, thank you Peter!) I set about extending the aft funnel and replacing the forward funnel. New 3D printed 4.7in Mk.IX QF guns were sourced from Shapeways but the barrels were as poor as the breach end was brilliant The barrels were thus sawn off and replaced with brass The torpedo mounts were likewise replaced by Shapeways items. They were extremely expensive for what they are, but they look nice The pair of Vickers 0.5in quad machine gun mounts were replaced with Tetra Modelworks items which I had used before on a HMS Hood build as was very happy with them I did as best I could in interpreting the scheme from the single wartime photograph I have ever seen. I had to pay around £20 for this from the Australian War Memorial to get a high resolution version to even find out if the photograph showed anything - the low-resolution version online just showed a smudge where the ship claimed to be So, after a few months' work, here it is. I never really finish model ships - I just stop. I plan to get some better paravanes and fit them to the deck at the stern, and I will definitely get some crew members to stand on watch when they become available from Northstar. For now though, it's safely in my display cabinet
  8. sovereignhobbies

    1/350 HMS Imperial D09

    The Law of ze Sod has struck me well and truely this time. Would you believe that after so much hunting around for *wartime* images of HMS Imperial and finding only the AWM image, and deciding to just build the model, one of the gents who has been central to our RN paints research project just returned from the National Archives having stumbled across a series of excellent quality images from Malta's drydock straight after it arrived there after the towing seen in the AWM photo I showed a crop of, in a file full of damage reports. Curiously, Imperial had special treatment in the file too as the rest of the reports were light to lacking on photographs. This is excellent. I but wish my grandmother were still around to see these photos. As for the model, there are good and bad points. On the plus side, the drydock photos don't contradict my 507A / 507C colour scheme assumption. Furthermore, whilst none of the photos show the whole ship what they do show is approximately similar camouflage on both port and starboard side. The photos do clearly show the TSDS fit in place rather than depth charge equipment, so I did get that right. On the negative side, I didn't get the stern camouflage right though. It's more like a reverse of the bow, but leaving a rectangular light grey bit on the stern with black pennant number. Perhaps the biggest difference though and the one worrying me the most is that the mainmast has completely gone. Instead there appears to be a stub mast on the searchlight platform. As the first ship I have finished in a while I am having second thoughts about hacking it up already, so am going to think on it for a while. Ultimately though, I think it will need to be fixed.
  9. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Sovereign Hobbies Colourcoats enamel paint set for Royal Navy Camouflage 1941-1943. The Admiralty Disruptive type camouflage schemes were extensively used mid war on vessels of all sizes, and typically comprised between 3 to 5 of the following colours; MS1, MS2, 507A, B5, MS3, B6, MS4, 507C and MS4A. Enamel model paints.
  10. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Colourcoats Set 1943-1945 Royal Navy B&G Series Colourset. G5 G10 (Shade of 507A) 10% RF, B15, G20, B20 (introduced in late 1944), B30, G45 (Shade of 507C), B55. Enamel model paint.
  11. sovereignhobbies

    Telford. Who's going?

    Henchman and I are 99% sure that Awesome Paint Stirrer and RLMman are in fact one in the same person...
  12. sovereignhobbies

    Warren's New HMS Rodney Adventure.

    This took some calculation. I should have prepared better earlier... I have converted both sets of colours to true greyscale but retaining the exact Light Reflectance Values of each. This perhaps explains the tonal problems with all Snyder & Short copies better than words. Note how the documented numbers of the left go from smallest to largest and our new paints likewise graduate from darkest to lightest, whilst the Snyder & Short ones jump back and forth. Anyone trying to make sense of B&W images with the shades on the left is on a hiding to nothing due to this. That's why there are so many versions of colour schemes around and each of them is contradicted by some real piece of evidence - the jigsaw pieces just don't fit together:
  13. sovereignhobbies

    Telford. Who's going?

    Ach it's ok Darren - it's just one of those things that needs to be done. It's a long weekend of standing with a smile painted on and aching feet and face at best. It's the little things that can irritate beyond reason though, like club wrist banders in early trying to get in about your stuff whilst still setting up and wanting to buy something when the computer is off and the card machine and money box are buried under a mountain of stuff. It sounds ungrateful, I'm sure, but it's hard not to be grimacing thinking "we're trapped here all weekend - can't you just come back after the show opens and we're set up?" We were accosted by some absolute rocket at teardown last year too, wanting to know if we'd changed formulae because he bought one tin from White Ensign Models 7 years ago and it wouldn't dry but it couldn't be anything he did wrong because his paint stirrer was "awesome". I literally just walked away (with paint rack on a trolley). Another trader reported him to the hall manager and we got a mail from the latter when we got home asking if it needed following up - it didn't - but for sure trading reveals a side to modelling that you'd rather not know was there! 🤣
  14. sovereignhobbies

    Telford. Who's going?

    Me. Dreading it already 🤐
  15. sovereignhobbies

    Warren's New HMS Rodney Adventure.

    Hi Warren, It might not be the worst idea to just go with Home Fleet Grey. My corrected paints are not in Australia. Creative have the old colours we inherited from White Ensign Models. As such, you can't buy mine regardless but nevertheless the exercise of correcting these colours has been massively time consuming and extremely expensive for us as a small business. The money we spent on travel expenses alone to visit the things we needed to see was substantial, never mind the manhours I poured into it - if only model paint were lucrative enough to take a wage from! All other model paints labelled as Royal Navy colours are copied from Snyder & Short's chips. John Snyder of Snyder & Short (but it's been run solely by Randy Short for a long time now) worked for White Ensign Models and was the first to attempt RN paints. Everyone else copied them except for AKAN which have some differences and are slightly better than the rest in some areas. AKAN's B5 for instance lacks B5's brilliance, but it's a lot better than the medium greys everyone else is selling - including what's labelled as "B5" in your Hataka set who copied Snyder & Short down to the non-existant "RN Warm White" and non-existant "Late War B55". It may sound anal, but the fundamental problem you are going to have in simply figuring out "which colour goes where" is that all (except ours, which I can't sell you anyway) are a train-crash of inaccuracies of varying severity. Some like B5 and B6 are simply nothing like the real colours, but almost all of them have tonal problems meaning the colours are darker than the ones they're supposed to be lighter than or lighter than the ones they're supposed to be darker than. At very best, what you'll end up with will look a bit weird. At worst, you'll kick the model across the room trying to reconcile the irreconcilable when looking at B&W photos trying to work out what the hell is going on. This image below contains the 1942 paint colours (excluding Mountbatten Pink and the Western Approaches Light Blue and Light Green which are not relevant to Rodney) ordered from darkest at the top to lightest at the bottom - this is in accordance with primary source documented evidence: Our research group can generate scores if not hundreds of emails to each other and dozens of photographs, not to mention sometimes empassioned debate and exasperation trying to nail down the scheme of a single ship. By way of example, here's Rodney as a work in progress. For the record, I don't think either of these is correct and we're not sure we've got the right colour palette on either. We're working from more B&W images than I can count, a good handful of contemporary paintings and some washed out colour cinefilm from OP Pedestal, which although far from clear is better than we have for most ships. I started turning grey in my early twenties. I'm 37 now. I swear I'm going to look like Gandalf The White by the time I'm 40 if I keep working on ship camouflage! In a nutshell, it's difficult working out paint schemes when you do know what the colours actually looked like. It'll be a very frustrating exercise trying to do it with paints which are neither the correct hue nor tone (relative to each other, never mind in absolute terms). Rodney was painted in overall Home Fleet Grey (Admiralty Pattern 507A) in 1941 for the Bismarck chase
  16. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Colourcoats Set RAF V-Bomber and Fighters 1970s. BS381C-241 Dark Green BS381C-638 Dark Sea Grey BS381C-627 Light Aircraft Grey. Royal Air Force RAF V-Bombers: Victor, Vulcan; Fighters: Phantom, Hunter; Light Bombers: Canberra; Transports:Hercules C.1, 1970s into 1980s.. Enamel model paint set.
  17. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Sovereign Hobbies Colourcoats enamel paint set for USAF F-4 Phantom Euro scheme. Whereas the "European One" scheme comprised a similar appearance, F-4s specifically differed in retaining the FS 34079 as the darkest tone, the same paint used in the South East Asia schemes. Features 3 x 14ml tins of enamel paints matched to the originals including: 1 x ACUS19 - Green Olive Drab FS24102 1 x ACUS20 - Forest Green FS34079 1 x ACUS43 - Dark Gunship Gray FS36081
  18. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Colourcoats Set USAF South East Asia Colourset. Zinc Chromate Yellow Gray FS26622 FS36622 Tan FS22019 FS32019 Green Olive Drab FS24102 FS34102 Forest Green FS24079 FS34079 Post-war Insignia White FS27875 Vietnam enamel model paint. Colourcoats Set Royal Navy 1940 to May 1943 Western Approaches Colourset Royal Navy Western Approaches Peter Scott Light Blue Green 1941 to 1943, destroyer, corvette, sloop, minesweeper and frigates. Enamel model paint. Sovereign Hobbies Colourcoats enamel paint set for Royal Navy Western Approaches schemes from May 1943 to 1945 in WW2. Used on destroyer, corvette, sloop classes most famously on North Atlantic convoy escort duty.
  19. I'm in an experimentation / development sort of mood at the moment rather than an "out-perform-myself" sort of mood. So, following on from my recent F-86D Sabre Dog completion which was to try to figure out a way to get a natural metal finish I liked (I'm not done with that yet, btw) I thought I would try something that relates directly to our own paint and what can be done with it (and what cannot). I have read about "hairspray chipping" numerous times but had never tried it nor understood how to do it. A casual attempt without knowing anything else was a total failure. I kept reading that it could only be done with acrylic paints but this included everything from water based vinyl types to acrylic lacquers, so I knew that this apparent requirement had to be based on nothing more than the popular position of acrylic=good, enamel=bad despite acrylic meaning anything under the sun really. Thus, I decided that this old piece of Corsair which featured on the F-86D thread could lend its services again: You find with stuff like hairspray chipping that "everyone" just knows how to do it, but nobody has written down how to do it. Eventually I learned that what is required is water for the scratching-off phase at the end. Armed with this little nugget, I sprayed some hairspray straight from the aerosol can (that part is to be refined in the forthcoming) onto the piece shown above - 4 coats, actually, and whilst that dried I thinned down some Colourcoats enamel - which happened to be a matt dark olive shade I had on the bench next to the airbrush - but it could have been hot pink for all I cared here. Anyway, it works. Hairspray chipping works with a Colourcoats topcoat (the chipping coat) at least over an Alclad base. In the forthcoming I shall establish how (not if) to chip between layers of enamel. Also, there's the more subtle task of actually getting good at it! The test there is, admittedly, a mess, however it served a valuable purpose. Under water, I was able to remove Colourcoats enamel with a cut-down paint brush (but it had some paint dried in it - that's where the scratches came from), and I also tried a kitchen scouring pad which was responsible for most of the exposed silver there. Using a kit from the stash that doesn't need much effort, is quite cheap and as common as dirt (so I don't care if I mess this up), I now aim to incorporate this into a model and, specifically, use the hairspray chipping method exposing bare metal and yellow zinc chromate primer in different areas. If anyone wishes to follow, comment, criticise, suggest better ways, educate, point, laugh, whatever, please join in The victim - a nice enough kit. I have always struggled to get the wing join such that I'm happy with it but overall if it goes well I will enjoy having it and if it's a disaster then no real harm done! I'm not investing much in this, but probably will stretch to seatbelts just incase it ends up looking ok in the end. I'm not spending money on them though - instead I'll use these ones from an Eduard SBD Dauntless fret. I don't like the pre-painted ones Eduard make now - the paint self-strips when the belts are bent to suit, and I don't like the superfabric ones either. I need to find a new source of belts or at least belt buckles - but that's another matter I started by spraying most of the parts with Alclad Duralumin whilst still on the runners. After assembly the wing leading edges etc will probably need another blow over
  20. sovereignhobbies

    Painting technique experimentation - Tamiya 1/48 F4U-1A Corsair paint mule

    It was a similar holding me back from a few aspirational projects! Since my last post, I have been able to confirm that the hairspray can be decanted from its aerosol can into my airbrush (a Badger Renegade Krome with 0.2mm needle/nozzle) and airbrushed neat with far better control than by aerosol. That is now drying. This is the hairspray I am using: Well it worked again - perhaps a little bit too well! Mistakes and non-ideal outcomes are ok though - that's what this build is all about. I shall experiment with different film thicknesses of hairspray applied. I'm not sure if it's too much hairspray or letting it soak too ling in water that caused this. I think less hairspray will be what I try next though. It takes a bit of rubbing to get the enamel surface to break then it comes away easily. These are the scratching tools I used - the brush is one of those double ended things which come in Airfix starter kits - they're useless for brush painting but the stiff bristles work well for this. I began scratching off the paint as soon as I had cleaned the airbrush, and it was done under cold running water (but I gather any water is fine). The principle is that the paint sits just fine on dry hairspray, but exposure of the hairspray to water dissolves it and it lifts away taking paint above with it.
  21. sovereignhobbies

    Revell 1/48 F-86D Sabre Dog

    This has been my first completely OOB build for a long time, and I have quite enjoyed it. The kit itself does steer that largely - I wouldn't enjoy making an OOB model from something with glaring omissions like seatbelts! Build thread here: Not much else needs to be said about this really. It is essentially a glorified paint mule to try out some ideas I had for natural metal finishes before getting to that stage of two somewhat larger and rather expensive models (both in money and my time to get to that stage). That said, I'm content with how it turned out although I will build another test model to refine my ideas a bit. Not everything went well! This one is painted with Alclad II and Colourcoats. The only thing added to the model is self adhesive car wheel balance weights, and I did the tiniest amount of modification to the ejector seat firing handles and corrected the rudder trim tab following advice I received on the forum.
  22. sovereignhobbies

    Revell 1/48 F-86D Sabre Dog

    I've been stuck in a rut, I feel, with a gravitation towards WW2 single engine piston types (except for my last two completions which have been piston twins). My dad very recently gave me this F-86D, and I decided to just build it OOB. I wanted one anyway, but hadn't looked in to the origins of this kit. I assumed it was one of Monogram's classics but it's actually quite recent (relatively speaking). The instructions are typically Revell USA The parts placement is a bit vague but I do like that they call out the colours they mean, not just the nearest vaguery in a generic brand owned by the same outfit. The decal sheet looks nice. How they perform remains to be seen of course... The detailing on this kit is nicely pitched. There aren't billions of tiny, pointless pieces but it isn't barren either. The exterior detail is recessed and quite finely done. The only bits I've found worth commenting negatively against are a pair of matching sink marks. These have since been filled. They will be visible but not accessible after assembly. Anyhoo - I set about building! The instructions said to paint the cockpit Dark Gull Gray, so I did. And this is where we're up to. The undercarriage wells are built up and painted green, and the instrument panel has likewise been painted as has the jet pipe. I might get the fuselage closed up tomorrow? Maybe? Not liking to make life easy for myself, I started another long-term stash-dweller too today 🙄
  23. sovereignhobbies

    Revell 1/48 F-86D Sabre Dog

    Now completed. RFI here:
  24. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

    Colourcoats Set Royal Navy 1944- Standard Scheme A Colourset Royal Navy late second world war British Pacific Fleet G10 Dark Grey decks G45 Light Grey hull with B20 blue grey rectangular panel on hull. Enamel model paint. Colourcoats Set 1936-1941 Home Fleet Colourset Admiralty Pattern 507A and 507B Dark Grey, Home Fleet Shade aka Home Fleet Grey. Dark deck grey non-slip paint. Red oxide Royal Navy anti-fouling red paint. Applicable to all large ships in the Royal Navy Home Fleet from 1936 until circa 1941. Enamel model paint. Colourcoats Set 1936-1941 Foreign Stations Colourset Admiralty Pattern 507C Foreign Stations Grey aka Mediterranean Grey aka Light Grey. Dark Deck Grey. Royal Navy red oxide anti-fouling red hull. Enamel model paint. Colourcoats is the only model paint with 507C at the correct tone - all others are much too light.
  25. sovereignhobbies

    Colourset improvements

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