Jump to content

sovereignhobbies

Members
  • Content Count

    716
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1,100 Excellent

1 Follower

About sovereignhobbies

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 03/09/1981

Personal Information

Recent Profile Visitors

4,954 profile views
  1. We have released a mini-version of Royal Navy Confidential Book 3098(R) 1945 Edition, which unlike our 1943 version does not contain all the theory which comprises the bulk of the pages and instead only reproduces the descriptions of the Standard Scheme camouflage types now being promoted as well as the detailed instructions on how ships were to be painted in accordance with said Standard Schemes. Many of you will immediately recognise some of these schemes - Standard Scheme A is perhaps most famous for its use on the ships of the British Pacific Fleet. Indeed it's the scheme you need for a Tamiya HMS King George V or Trumpeter's HMS Nelson kits. CB3098(R)-1945 contained more than this however, also detailing schemes to be used on minesweepers, convoy escorts, Coastal Forces boats such as the Fairmile M.T.B.s, Landing Craft and also submarines. https://www.sovereignhobbies.co.uk/collections/royal-navy-documents/products/royal-navy-camouflage-c-b-3098r-1945-edition-the-camouflage-of-ships-at-sea-ship-painting-guide-extract?fbclid=IwAR3oLdQGXY0UuRnsZnWQRTcDtpc_p2mFRp9RqHNXEWFtHn3UJnVuPMGGFVw
  2. If anyone has Trumpeter's 1/350 HMS Kent in their stash, Richard Dennis, Rob Matthews and I have done the best we can tying up a few inconsistencies between photographs and some written documentation versus previously published resources: Hope this is useful to someone?
  3. Starling Models' Round Table class trawler HMT Sir Gareth in 1/350 scale. Eight Round Table class trawlers were built for the Royal Navy between the years 1941 and 1942, all by one of two shipyards in my home town of Aberdeen in the north east of Scotland. They were based on a 1936 trawler called Star of Orkney, and measured 125 feet long whilst they displaced just under 450 tons. They had a relatively large crew for a vessel this size of 35, and the vessels were all commissioned as minesweepers. They carried one 12 pounder anti-aircraft gun, 1 20mm Oerlikon and a pair of .303 machine guns. Hall, Russell & Co closed down in 1990. The shed has now gone but the slipway remains. The site is now used by Dales Marine Services, an offshore logistics company supporting the oil & gas industry. Goods come and go by road and are loaded onto supply vessels. His Majesty's Trawler Sir Gareth was launched 19th January 1942 and carried the pennant number T227. HMT Sir Gareth appears to be wearing a single colour scheme, which in 1942 could either be Admiralty Pattern 507A Home Fleet Grey, or possibly MS2. I don't like MS2 much, and in the bliss of ignorance otherwise, I will use Home Fleet Grey which I find a much more pleasing shade of grey. The kit is, I believe, CAD designed and used 3D printed masters which have been used for cast resin parts. The kit costs approximately £55 from Starling Models which may appear a lot for such a small model, however the quality is exceptional and the kit is very complete indeed. I have thoroughly enjoyed this model and highly recommend it to the moderate or experienced modellers. Everything fits as it should. No scratchbuilding or improvisation skills are necessary but obviously it's a small model and a lot of the parts are small accordingly. Thank you for looking.
  4. Today I completed the fit out of the model, and carried out the rigging using black Infini Model 40 denier (0.068mm diameter) lycra rigging line for most of it, and their white 20 denier line for the signal halyards. I do this using medium CA same as I used for the rest of the model, and apply a dab with a needle at one attachment point then touch the lycra line to it and let it tack. I then apply another dab of glue at the destination attachment point and use my tweezers to place the line there leaving a tail. Once both ends are secured I trim the tail off using a fresh Swann Morton 10A scalpel blade and tweezers. Working the way round... I have found that my favourite way to attach lines to other lines is to cut over-size lengths, apply a dot of glue to the parent line then lay in the end of the new line. It's easier to do this, I've found, than try to get the tension right coming up to meet another line and then successfully trim a tail off without accidently chopping the line I'm attaching to!
  5. You didn't start this And yes, this is pretty much what I meant!
  6. For the time being I'm not sure this is news at all, and the supposed quote is unverified and possibly out of context. I'll wait to see if WingNutWings announces it. As per a response I just made on Facebook an hour or two ago on same subject - I have discovered that I've gone bust on the internet at least twice since I started my little business. Rumours spread like wildfire. Or a virus. Some of it is because people feel like they're helping by sharing what they think is news, but it's started by people who so dearly want to be "in the know" who are so frantic to be the ones to share it that they don't get bogged down in little details like whether it's true or not.
  7. If you do (and it's always worth trying new things) get a good one. Probably more so than with aircraft, a good kit is a pleasure whilst a bad one can be soul destroying mostly due to the sort of sinking horror one can feel when realising some PE'd up sub assembly wont fit another because it's been poorly designed. They can be easy shelf-of-doom fodder when not that good unfortunately. There are plenty good ones to choose from at least to begin with though I found some of these parts a bit fiddly to assemble. Everything fit properly, but alignment, holding in place and gluing was a challenge
  8. It's not so different Darren. You just don't move your hands so far 😂
  9. These are the work in progress pictures I was trying to get yesterday when I screwed up... the form is starting to come together.
  10. I got the superstructure detail painted yesterday then went for some photographs and dropped the damn thing. Argh! It's OK but the little pole on the front of the funnel pinged off as did the ammo box cantilevered off the aft end. Both are gone... The pole is already replaced and painted. I am making a new ammunition box as, bizarrely, I have nothing similar here I could use! The scandal... Anyway, I detailed the children to build a stone perimeter for an outdoor fire. We toasted some marshmallows and hot dog sausages. Repairs are now completed except for touching up the paint work. That'll teach me to allow myself to become distracted carrying a model placed together but not yet glued together carelessly!
  11. Every pigment is a chemical in its own right though, as are the metallic particles which go into metallics. Very few chemicals are truely inert and mixing them with other chemicals to make a paint will lead to unforeseen reactions when they're combined in different ways. Hell chrome green as a pigment kills itself! It's made by precipitating Prussian Blue pigment onto chrome yellow, but over time the chrome yellow eats the blue and results in a stronger yellow overall! What different pigments do on their own over time is one thing. What they do when combined with others and binder and flatting agents and anti-skinning agents then placed inside a container which has chemical properties of its own (ok glass is pretty safe, but the plastic lid and seal isn't but no better or worse than tinlets) is a matter of accumulated experience over a rather long time doing it. My knowledge is fairly embryonic at this stage, I hasten to add!
  12. Those Xtracolor silver issues were caused by an inadvertent chemical reaction. It's the reason we dropped the silvers a good while back - we had some common ingredients it turned out and had an instance of the same thing happening here once. The issue was has been resolved now with an additive, but I never really liked enamel silvers so I've never reintroduced them to our range.
×
×
  • Create New...