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sovereignhobbies

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  • Birthday 03/09/1981

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  1. I think I've now corrected the worst of my errors on this one, so cautiously suggest that it may, in effect, most uncharacteristically, be finished.
  2. I realised the wheels in this kit are unweighted, and found myself greatly lamenting Ultracast's decision not to supply to trade any more hence I haven't got any I can take from stock. Wanting to just get this done rather than ordering/waiting/spending more again I just did it the cheapskate's way and weighted the wheels using a cigarette lighter. I realised I hadn't painted the rocket rails so they're not added yet and hence it's not actually finished. Also, I've just been gently reminded that there shouldn't be any wing guns - what a snafu! I'll get rid of those! Look at those frigging wing guns saying "Ha ha you smug git - thought you had the wings sorted when you caught the blisters and that landing light didn't you?". They'll have to go... And don't forget about me!
  3. The B & C wing has the leading edge crank for the undercarriage bays in a different place compared to the D, so it wouldn't really help them. I can only surmise they're moulded separately to ensure the sleeved fairings that the barrels poke through are sufficiently defined and don't end up staggered if the punters don't take as much care as Duncan has on the interior, ending up in a fatter fuselage than it should be, which in turn would force the roots of the upper halves of the wings outboard slightly, which in turn will slightly reduce dihedral and shear the upper and lower halves of the wings - which would be painfully obvious at the guns when the half-holes no longer lined up!
  4. These are looking great Duncan, and the cockpits are especially nice considering that you make no secret of not really enjoying cockpit detailing.
  5. They had this one in silver in his album: Here are a few more He went to 74 Sqn onto Venoms after this, then 43 Sqn to Meteor F8s.
  6. A little progress to report. I kinda need to start painting engines, undercarriage legs and all that sort of stuff. I need the Lockheed tailwheel for this particular airframe. Most of the Dallachy Beaufighters showed evidence of fabric patches on the cannons, the wing fillets etc stuck on with red dope so I should study the Avieology photographs to see if any are visible on RD136. I've been a bit heavy handed with the clay wash (by Flory) which I've tried for the first time. I'll have to do more to make that stand out less...
  7. I think that one was NV422 described (note that all list squadron code as EE but it's clearly photographed to have been EO): (source https://wartimes.ca/forums/viewtopic.php?t=588) Bristol Beaufighter, NV422 EE-C Pilot: F/O H.C. Lynch, J/35785, RCAF, Mallory town, Ontario, Canada Navigator: F.O. Knight, J/36373, RCAF, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Aircraft damaged, the pilot tried to land on an elevation, but the terrain makes this an impossibility. The plane breaks in half during the ensuing crash and the cockpit section slides down the hillside for more than 500 meters. Sadly, the crew did not survive in the crash. As compared to: Bristol Beaufighter, RD136 EE-Q1 Pilot: F/O H. Smook, J/36168, RCAF, St. Malo, Manitoba, Canada Navigator: W/O A.M. Duckworth, J/97139, RCAF, Angus, Ontario, Canada Aircraft cause of loss has not been established Both the pilot, Harry Smook, and navigator, Alan Murray Duckworth, both Canadians, were lost none the less.
  8. Nice work Duncan. As for markings, I strongly support building whichever one you like the most and if that's Big Beautiful Doll, so be it. It's popular because it's a cracking set of markings. Incidently, Gill and I were at Duxford on both days of Flying Legends 2011 and watched the airshow regular Big Beautiful Doll which had until very recently belonged to the man flying it, the-then 64 year old Rob Davies, and had just been sold to Meier Motors in Germany and re-registered D-FBBD. Meier Motors had asked Rob to fly it at Flying Legends. At the end of Flying Legends there's always a big formation flypast and then the formations split into sections of 3 or 4 to space out, with the next in the queue breaking onto cross-wind leg for landings. Rob was leading his section, but the French pilot of visiting Douglas Skyraider lost sight of him during the break, but decided to pull an aggressive break anyway and hit Rob's Mustang under the belly. A big chunk of the Skyraider's right wing broke off and the aircraft pulled a tight, ugly corkscrew around its missing wing, which twinkled as it caught the afternoon sunlight as it fell. Looking now, it's a lot less wing than it appeared at the time - it seemed watching it like a gun camera reel of an Fw190 getting hit in the wing root by 20mm shells. Gill and I were watching from the Land Warfare Museum and were looking dead-astern the pair as they converged. I was convinced I was going to see two pilots die, being sceptical about whether either aircraft could be flyable after that. I briefly lost sight of them as I moved for a clearer view and saw one aircraft, now a mile or so away slowly but steadily pitch over and disappear into a dip in the terrain, with a little parachute which looked orange appear unfeasibly short a time before the aircraft vanished. Your mind takes you back to those VHS training tapes the RAF gives even to air cadets which basically tells you that unless you have 1000ft plus below you then forget it. Owing to such a big chunk of wing coming off, I convinced myself I'd watched the Skyraider pile in and started looking for the Mustang. That shows you how reliable eye witness statements are! Here's a now-famous photograph taken by someone further east up the airfield depicting Big Beautiful Doll a few seconds before it hit the ground. In a TV interview afterwards Rob said that he found he had no pitch control, and that he'd always made a point of regularly drilling how he'd abandon the aircraft. The French pilot was able to land the Skyraider, although in was quite a hot landing taking most of Duxford to roll to a halt. He just sat in the cockpit for a good number of minutes after shutting down at the far end of the field. One can only imagine the fright you'd get. At time of Rob Davies' TV interview the French pilot hadn't attempted to contact him about it. It made for quite uncomfortable watching, but as with almost all mishaps there is a learning opportunity.
  9. Very nice. It's becoming a bit of a cliched subject for XVIIIs now but I'll surely be adding another! Here's some photos from my grand father's album - he was on 208 Sqn at this time:
  10. Here's the result compared to the pure original: This was given the salt treatment, blown over with a darker tint closer to the original ESDG, then blended after that with a slightly lighter mix heavily thinned. These aircraft were seen to show darker smears from various liquids such as the windscreen anti-icing, petrol, engine oil, hydraulic oil and so on, so as said above it will start to turn darker again soon. I neglected to take any photos but the Sky underneath was also cut with light grey for this one. The aircraft now has an identity. There are still stencil decals to apply. Joy.
  11. The fuselage was left thus: I airbrushed a light grey enamel on just to see what I really had. As evidenced, this was absolutely nowhere near good enough! Out with Infini Model's nuclear grade 220 grit hard sanding sticks to remove plastic where there are clear high points. This was later smoothed down with a 600 grit stick, then a 1000 grit sanding sponge each iteration. Leading to: Another shoot of grey reveals that most of the basic mismatch has now gone, but there's still a visible line where I cut it. The Squadron green putty is softer than plastic so even with hard sanding sticks it will always disappear at a quicker rate than the plastic. Some Mr Surfacer 1000 was employed to fill the remaining depression where the cut line was. After another sanding we have this, which for a quick build I think shall do. I think the cut'n'shut was worth the work since the Beau looks pretty good in profile now. That brings us to tonight. The interior has been loosely painted in Interior Grey-Green, dark washed using a linseed oil based wash slightly thinned with our naptha. The panel is just light black with the kit decals and has the instrument faces 'glazed' with Clearfix. The two halves are glued together and is drying. I've made the blisters over the Mk.XII wing's fuel feeds which hopped up and over the main spar. I'm also adjusting the wingtips to represent a Mk.XII wing. The rear lenses are filled and faired in, to be painted over and hidden in due course, whilst to represent the smaller navigation light lenses I made saw cuts most of the way down the lense such that I could paint silver down the cut line to give the lense the appearance of being smaller. I took the opportunity to drill them out and tint to represent the bulbs. Once the glue is dry on these they'll be cleaned up, faired in and polished. You may notice I have sawn out the root and tip ends of the ailerons too. This is now all glued together. I cut slots and fitted small pieces of brass tubes for the elevator hinges. Here's how the tailplanes fit on the kit. I'd hoped for better, but it's not too bad. I've certainly paid more for a lot worse in the past... At least they're square though! The Beaufighter is now ready for exterior painting RD136 wasn't brand new when lost, and Extra Dark Sea Grey is well known for fading quite quickly due to chalking as a principle mechanism, often displacing a blue appearance. The weathering I will do will darken this model, so I have started by diluting Extra Dark Sea Grey with some blue-grey to give me a base to start from. Here's the result compared to the pure original:
  12. The fuselage was left thus: I airbrushed a light grey enamel on just to see what I really had. As evidenced, this was absolutely nowhere near good enough! Out with Infini Model's nuclear grade 220 grit hard sanding sticks to remove plastic where there are clear high points. This was later smoothed down with a 600 grit stick, then a 1000 grit sanding sponge each iteration. Leading to: Another shoot of grey reveals that most of the basic mismatch has now gone, but there's still a visible line where I cut it. The Squadron green putty is softer than plastic so even with hard sanding sticks it will always disappear at a quicker rate than the plastic. Some Mr Surfacer 1000 was employed to fill the remaining depression where the cut line was. After another sanding we have this, which for a quick build I think shall do. I think the cut'n'shut was worth the work since the Beau looks pretty good in profile now. That brings us to tonight. The interior has been loosely painted in Interior Grey-Green, dark washed using a linseed oil based wash slightly thinned with our naptha. The panel is just light black with the kit decals and has the instrument faces 'glazed' with Clearfix. The two halves are glued together and is drying. I've made the blisters over the Mk.XII wing's fuel feeds which hopped up and over the main spar. I'm also adjusting the wingtips to represent a Mk.XII wing. The rear lenses are filled and faired in, to be painted over and hidden in due course, whilst to represent the smaller navigation light lenses I made saw cuts most of the way down the lense such that I could paint silver down the cut line to give the lense the appearance of being smaller. I took the opportunity to drill them out and tint to represent the bulbs. Once the glue is dry on these they'll be cleaned up, faired in and polished. You may notice I have sawn out the root and tip ends of the ailerons too. This is now all glued together. I cut slots and fitted small pieces of brass tubes for the elevator hinges. Here's how the tailplanes fit on the kit. I'd hoped for better, but it's not too bad. I've certainly paid more for a lot worse in the past... At least they're square though! The Beaufighter is now ready for exterior painting RD136 wasn't brand new when lost, and Extra Dark Sea Grey is well known for fading quite quickly due to chalking as a principle mechanism, often displacing a blue appearance. The weathering I will do will darken this model, so I have started by diluting Extra Dark Sea Grey with some blue-grey to give me a base to start from. Here's the result compared to the pure original: This was given the salt treatment, blown over with a darker tint closer to the original ESDG, then blended after that with a slightly lighter mix heavily thinned. These aircraft were seen to show darker smears from various liquids such as the windscreen anti-icing, petrol, engine oil, hydraulic oil and so on, so as said above it will start to turn darker again soon. I neglected to take any photos but the Sky underneath was also cut with light grey for this one. The aircraft now has an identity. There are still stencil decals to apply. Joy.
  13. The labels were changed again, and we've been gradually expanding (when I have time to scribble some pictures!)
  14. Obviously, our ACRN34 is a precise match for the RAF Museum chips photographed above too.
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